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planet will be conspicuous near the eastern of study. The observer will also find agreeable horizon in the mornings about an hour or so entertainment in the phenomena attending the preceding sunrise.

revolution of the four satellites. The position of Venus will become a resplendent object in the the planet is in Libra. summer months as an evening star, and in the Saturn comes to conjunction with the sun on autumn and winter months will be equally January 9, and will be a conspicuous object in brilliant in the morning sky. This planet ar Gemini during the first few months of the year. rives at greatest E. elongation on July 13, and The luminous rings may be viewed under most at greatest W. elongation on December 2; and favourable conditions, though they are not so on August 16 and October 28 attains a very high widely open as during the few preceding opposi. degree of brilliancy. During the first half of the tions. Early in January the planet's diameter year Venus will present a gibbous phase, but in renches 18.6 seconds. In the summer months Ju and the four succeeding months will be he will be practically invisible, but emerges crescented in varying degree, according as her from the sun's rays in September, and during position with respect to the Sun changes. On the last quarter will be in good aspect, chiefly as September 21 this planet comes to inferior con a morning star in Cancer. junction with sun.

Uranus may be observed during the first half Mars will appear in the morning sky during of the year. His position is in Virgo, about the later months of the year, but he is not 3 degrees S. of the equator, and on March 31 he thoroughly well placed at any time. The planet will be in opposition with the sun. This planet will be a somewhat diminutive object in a tele- is visible to the naked eye on a dark night as a scope, as his apparent diameter is less than faint star, and in a telescope his small disc of 8 seconds. On August 28 Mars and Saturn will 4 secs. diameter can be well perceived. On be close together, the distance separating them Nov. 24 he will be only 1 degree $. of Venus. being less than one degree. The study of areo Neptune, the minute telescopic planet, must graphic features must be left to the early months he looked for, if at all, in the autumnal months, of 1888.

he reaches opposition to the Jupiter will be a fine object during the first November 21. half of the year, but his declination being some It is a fact worthy of special comment that all 11 degrees south of the equator, observations of the major planets of our system will be visible his surface cannot be continued with so much in the morning sky at the early part of Decem. effect as during the few previous years. This ber. An observer who surveys the firmament planet arrives at opposition to the sun on before sunrise at this period will find it very April 21, and will be in conjunction with the rich in bright stars and planets. It is only at sun on November 9. He will be very near long intervals that all the leading planets are Mercury at the end of November and beginning thus presented to view at the same time. of December. Numerous changes occur on the Shooting Stars.--These phenomena should be large disc of this planet. They are probably of expected on the following dates, when it is most atmospheric character, though some of the essential that careful observations he secured. markings distinguished show a striking degree Though no conspicuous displays may take of permanency. The great red spot, which place in regard to the November showers, it is became well visible in July, 1878, is still to be necessary to be prepared for such an event :-seen, and there are brilliant white spots involved Jan, 2, April 19-20, July 27-30, August 9-11, with the equatorial belts which are well worthy | Oct. 18-19, Nov. 13-14, Nov. 26-27, and Dec. 9-12.

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Large Comets.

The following is a table of some of the largest comets observed during the present century:

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June 27

80 44

318 47

140 25 273 42 303 3 215 43 248 56

I 12 337 48

161

278 39

76 11 33 33 57 57 35 41 48 41 63 I

165 19

! 1807 Parisi.

Sept. 18 1811, 1. Flaugergues Sept. 12 1819, 11. Tralles 1323 In Switzerland Dec.

9 1825, IV. Pons

Dec. 10 1899, IV. Bremiker

Nov. 13 1843, 1. Several observers Feb. 27 1845, III. De Vico..

June

5 1858, VI. Donati

Sept. 29 1860), III. Several observers June 16 1861, I. Thatcher

June

3 1861, II. Tebbutt..

June 1 1862, III, Swift.

Aug. 22 1865, I. Moesta

Jan.

14 1867, I. Coggia

Jan. 19 1874, III. ('oggia

July 8 188),

1. Several observers Jan. 27 1881, III. Tebbutt..

June 16 1881, IV. Schäberle.

Aug. 22 1882, II, S veral observers Sept. 17

161 32

18

270 55 7 75 1 17 ! 287 5 IO

274 34
17

22 32
9
16

1
262

2
23 36 13
2
8

243 22
12

2494 22

344 41 7 141 15 20

75 52 20 | 271 7 11

73 34 II

265 13 8

334 55! 6

270 25

84 40

79 18

29 55

0'6462 D Bessel.
1'0354

R Argelander.
0'3410 D Tralles,
o'2265 R Encke.
1'2408 R Hansen.
0°4808D Götze.
o'0055 R Hubbardi.
0°4016 R D'Arrest.
0 5784 R v. Asten.
o'2929

D Moesta, o'9207

D Oppolzer, 0*8223 D Seeling. o'9626 R

Oppolzer. o'0260 R Tebbutt. 1*5725 D Searle. 0'6758 D Geelmuyden. o'0060 R Meyer. 07345

D Dunér. 096336 R Stechert. o'0077

R Krentz.

278 58

79 45 85 26

137 26

66 23

87 32

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355 54
270 58

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36 58 63 26 39 46 38

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Tais branch of astronomical inquiry has made bodies are of large size and formed of hard considerable advances during the last quarter of compact materials, can they penetrate the dense a century. The great meteoric storm of Novem- undor-layers of our atmosphere and (still reber 13, 1866, aroused general attention, and the taining much of their native condition) fall result of investigation has shown that these boilily upon the surface of the earth. phenomena are probably allied to comets, Every shower of meteors has a radiunt pointbeing, in fact, minute planetary bodies revolving in other words, a centre whence the indi. i in streams of countless atoms around the sun. vidual flights are successively directed. If the | The elements of some of their best-determined apparent paths are accurately observed and proorbits have been found to absolutely coincide jected on a celestial globe, it will be found that with certain periodic comets, and the name of they converge (like the spokes of a wheel) upon "cometoids" is occasionally, and no doubt pro a central point. This marks the focus of the perly, applied to those shooting stars which, it shower, and as there are many of these radiant is fair to assume, have a definite cometary origin. points in action on the same night, it is difficult The appearance of numbers of these bodies in to ascertain them with great precision, for an regular showers is well explained on the theory attentive and prolonged vigil will reveal shootthat the earth, during her orbital revolution, ing stars having every conceivable direction of

intersects cometary orbits (as proved in the case motion athwart the firmament. Several bunof the Lyrids, Perseids, Leonids, and Andromedex); dreds of well-marked showers have now been and these orbits are more or less replete with ascertained as the result of assiduous observadisintegrated and dispersed cometic materials, tion, but the extended durations of many of which, entering our atinosphere with great velo- these are difficult to reconcile with theory. city, are rendered combustible as the effects of Amongst English astronomers we owe much in concussion. They may either be gaseous, stony, the elucidation of these phenomena to the labours or metallic in their constitution; in any case of Prof. Herschel, Lieut.-Col. Tupman, Messrs. they are presented to the eye as luminous objects Greg, Glaisher, Denning, and others. in rapid motion, and are immediately consumed Annexed is a table of 40 Radiant points which ani frittered into harmless dust, which slowly embrace many of the principal showers visible and imperceptibly subsides upon the earth's during the year :-surface. Only in exceptional cases, where these i

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131+ 34

March 1

i Janúary 2-3 ...

232+49 Quadrantids Rich shower,9°NNW.8 Boötis Greg & Herschel. 2 Jannary 18-28 233+31

Coronids Observed in 1868 by Zezioli. S. & Zezioli. 3 February 20..

Coma Berenicids. Also in January and March. Denning. 4 February-March 177 +13 B Leonid.. Continued in April (Corder). Heis.

244 +15 y Herculids. II meteors per hour in 1869. Tupman. 6 March-April.

233+11

a Serpentids Also in January-February. Corder. 7 April

255+ 38 Herculids.. Visible also in July-Aug... S. & Zezioli, $ April 9-12

249 +51 1 Draconids.... Another shower, 184° +59° Denning. 9 April 19-20. 275+ 34 Lyride

269° +33° (D.). Comet I. 1861 Greg & Herschel, 10 April-May.

2275 8 Lybrids. Seen also in Jan. & Fel). Greg & Herschel. 11 April 29-May 6.. 326 – 2 a Aquariads Obs. in 1886 at 337°—2° (D.) Tupman. 12 May

232+27 a Coronid, Obs. in 1885, meteors small, Denning. 13 May-June

262 +64 8 Draconids. Visible also in other months. Denning. 14 May 29-June 4 333+27 » Pegurids Frequently seen in July.... Denning. 15 June 26-July 6.. 294 + 39 8 Cygnids... Obs. in 1886, meteors slow.. Denning. 16 July

258-20 o Ophinchidx 2549--21° Ap. 30, May 7'86 (D.) Neumayer. 17 July

11 +48 a Cassiopeids Meteors bright with streaks, Denning. 18 July 23-25--Aug. 4 48+43

a-6 Perseid's Active showers in '84 & '86. Denning. 19 July 27

7+32 T Andromedes.. 7 meteors per hour in 1870.. Tupmail. 20 July 27--29

341 -13 & Aquariads.. Shower of 63 meteors in 1879 Deining. 21 July 27-Aug. 11.. 291 + 51 o Cyguids.. Well observed in 1885-86.... Denning. zo July 30, August 1 350+ 51 Androinedex 345° +50° Aug. (Weiss) Denning. 23 August 8-23

74+63 e Camelids 159 meteors. In autumn also Heis. 24 August 9-11 43+ 56 Perseid's

Rich shower, Comet III. '62 Greg & Herschel 25 August 21–23....

o Draconids Shower of 56 meteors in 1879 Denning. zb Angust 21, Sept. 21

Perseid's

Meteors swift with streaks Denning. 27 aug.- Sept. -Oct. 292+70

6 Draconido Well observed in 1886 .. Heis & Denning. | 28 Sept. 15-Oct, 2 ..

73+41 a Aurigids Seen in 1877, '79, '84 & ’86 .. Denning. 26 Sept, 21-Oct. 5..

a Arietids Obs. '79 &'85. Also in Aug. Denning. 30 October 17-20

90+15 Orionida A rich annual display. A. S. Herschel. 31 October 29+ 8 Arietids. Well seen in 1877 79........

Corder. 32 Oct. --Nov.

Io8+238 Geminids Meteors swift with streaks.. G. & H., & others, 33 November 2-3..

55+ 9

Taurids. Shower of bright meteors '86 Denning. 34 November 13-14 149+23 Leonids.

Max. 1866. Comet I. 1866.. A. S. Herschel 35 November 13 28 155+ 40

Leo Minorids. Well observed in 1876 & 1885 Denning. 36 November 2028 63 +22 Taurids.. Also on September 21--22 Denninc. 37 November 27

25 + 43

Andromedes.. Max. '72 & 85. Biela's comet A. S. Herschel. 38 December 5-7

46+55

n Perseidx At 42° +55° Oct.6-16 '85 (D.) Backhouse. 39 December 7 IO..

117+ 32 a Geminids Shower of 21 meteors in 1885 Denning. 40 December 9-12.. 107+ 33

Geminids... A rich annual display...... Greg & Herschel.

291 +60

62+ 37

31 + 18

The following is a general catalogue of the elements of recent cometary orbits. We have confined the table to comets which have appeared since 1850. In addition to the principal elements, the dates of discovery and names of discoverers are given :-

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1857, 1857, 1857, 1857, 1857, 1857,

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h. 1850, I. July 23, 13 273 25 92 53 68 u 1'0814 D Carrivgton 1850, May Peterson. 1850,

II. Oct. 19, 8; 8920 206 0 40 6 0'5647 D Resllüber 1850, Aug. 29 G. P. Bond, 1851, I. April 1, 22 49 42 209 31 II 22

16999 D

Möller 1850, Nov. 28 C'hallis. 1851, II. July 9, 3322 56 148 25 13 55

Schuize 1851, June 27 D'Arrest. 1851, III. Ang. 26, 5310 58 223 40

38 9! 0'9843 D Brorsen 1851, Aug. 1 Brorsen), 1851, IV. Sep. 30, 19 338 46

D 73 59 0'1420

Klinkerfues 1851, Oct. 22 Brorst 11. 1852, I. Mar. 14,-18 157 51 334 23 13 7 0*3374

D Encko : 852, Jan. G

Hindl. 1852, II. April 19, 15 278 42 317 29

49 IT o'9129

R Hartwig 1852, May 15 ("hacornac. 1852, III. Sep. 22, 23 1098

245 51
12 33

0.8606 D Hubbard 1852, Aug. 25 Secchi. 1852, IV. Oct. 12, 15

43 12 346 13

40 58
12510

D Marth 1852, June 27 Westpinl. 1853, I. Feb. 24, o 153 44 69 34

20 13
1'0919 R

Hartwig
1853, Mar.

Succhi, 1853, II. May 9, 20 201 45

57 49 0'9087 R

Rümker 1853, April 4 Schweitzer. 1853,

I, 17 310 58 140 31 61 30 0 3067 D D'Arrest 1853, June 1o Klinkorfues. IV. Oct. 16, 14 302 7

220 4 61 I

0'1725 R Bruhns 1853, Sep. In Bruhns, I. Jan. 2, 17 56 39 227 66 I 2*0456 R

Klinkerfues 1853, Nov, 25 Van Arsitala. II. Mar. 24, o 213 49 315 27

o'2771

R Mathieu 1854, Mar. 24 Many Ohs. III. June 22,

2 272 58 347 48 71 8 0'6475 R Bruhns 1354, June 4. Klinkerfucs. IV. Oct. 27, 9

324 30 40 59

o 8001 D Bruhns 1854, Sep. 11 Klinkerfues. V. Dec, 15, 17 165 9238

8
14 9
1'3575 D

Adam 1854, Dec. 24 Colla. 1855, I. Fel).

5,
226 38 129 44 51 24

2'1935 R Thiele 1855, April 11 Schweitzer. 1855, II. May 30, 5 237 36 260 15

23

7 0'5678 R Donati 1855, June 3 Donati, 1855, III. July 1, 5. 157 53

13

8 0'3371 D Encke 1855, July 13 Maclear, 1855, IV. Nov. 25, 986 51 35 IO II I'2323 R

Hoek 1855, Nov. 12 Bruhne. I. Mar. 21, 8

74 49 313 12 87 57 07721 D Pape 1857, Feb. 22 D'Arrest. II. Mar. 28, 16 115 46 101 45 29 49

0'6206D Bruhns 1857, Mar, 18 Bruhns. III. July 17, 23, 249 37

23 40
59 0-3675 R

Pape 1857, June 92 Klinkerfucs.
IV. Aug. 24,

21 47
200 49
32 46 0*7468 D

Möller 1857, July 25 C. H, Peters.
V. Sep. 30, 19' 250 21

56 18 'o' 5651 R Bruhns 1857, Aug. 20 Klinkertnes. VI. Nov. 19, 2,

44 13 139 19 37 49 1'coco R Auwers 1857, Nov. 10 Dunati. 1857, VII. Nov, 28, 20 323

3
148 27

13 56 11696 D Schulze 1857, Dec. 5 Milclear. 1858, I. Feb. 23, 8 115 29 | 268 54

54 32
1'0274
D Bruhns 1858, Jan.

4 Tuttle. 1858, II. May I 275 40113 31 10 48 0*7683 D Hänsel

8 2,

1858, Mar,

Winnecke. 1858, III. May 2, 8 195 59 170 43 23 I'2097 D

Watson 1858, May 2 Tuttle. 1858, IV. June 5, 4 226 6 324 21 80 28 0'5462R Bruhns 1858, May 21 Bruhns, 1858, V. Sep. 13, 22 49 52 209 40 16948 D Möller 1858, Sep.

8

Bruhns. 1858, VI. Sep. 29, 23

36 13 165 19 63 2 0'5785 R Hill 1858, June 2 Donati. 1858, VII. Oct. 12, 19 4 13 159 45

1'4270 R Weiss 1858, Ser. 5 Tuttle. 1858, VIII. Oct. -18,9 157 57 334 29 13 4 o'3407 D Encke 1858, Aug. 7 Förster. May 29, 5 75 21 357 21

83 32 o'2010 R Hertsprung 1859, Ajiril 2 Tempel. 1860, I. Feb. 16, 17 173 45

324 3 79 35 1'1973 D Liais 1860, Feb. 26 Liais, 1860, II. Mar. 5, 17

8 56
48 13 1'3083 D Sceling

1860, April 17 Rümker. 1860, III. June 16, i 161 32

84 41

79 19 0'2929 D Auwers 1860, June 19 Many Ohs. 1860, IV. Sep. 28, 7 INT 59 104 14 28 14 o'9537 R Valz 1860, Oct. 23 Tempel. 1861, I. June 3, 10 243 22

29 56

79 46 0'9207 D Oppolzer 1861, April 4 Thatcber. 1861,

II. June , 12 249 5 278 59 35 26 0-8225 D Kreutz 1861, May 13 Tehbutt. 1861, III. Dec.

6
7, 3 173 30 145 41 57 0'8391 R

Pape 1861, Dec. 28 Tuttle. 1862, I. Feb.

6, 4158 0 334 31 13 5 o'3399 D Encke 1861, Sep. 28 Förster, 1862, II, June 22,

1 299 20

326 33
7 54 09813 R
Seeling 1862, July 1

Valz. 1862, III. Ang. 22, 22 344 41

66 25 o'9626 R Oppolzer 1862, July 15 Swift, 1862, IV. Dec. 28, 4 125 II

42 29 0*8032 R

Krahl 1862, Nov. 30 Bruhns. I. Feh.

3, 12191 23 116 56 85 22 0*7948 D Engelmann 1862, Nov. 28 Respighi. 1863, II. April 4, 22 247 15 251 16 67 22 1'0682 R Raschkoff 1863, April 11 Klinkerfues 1863, III. April 20, 21 305 31

249 59 85 29 0 6284 D Karlinski 1863, April 12, Respighi. 1863, IV. Nov. 9, 12

94 43 97 29 78 5 0'7066 D Oppolzer 1863, Nov. 4 Tempel. 1863, V. Dec. 27, 18

60 24 304 43 64 29 0*7715 D Valentiner 1863, Dec. 28 Respighi, 1863,

VI. Dec. 29, 4. 183 8 105 2 83 19 I'3131 D Rosén 1863, Oct. Bäcker. 1864, I. July 27, 21 190 10

44 56 06140 R

Celoria 1864, Sep. 9 Donati. II. Aug. 15, 14 304 12 95 15 I 52 09093 R Kowalczyk 1864, July 4 Tempel III. Oct. 11, I1 159 18 31 45 70 18 09311 R V. Asten 1864, July 23 Donnti. IV. Dec. 22, II 321 43

203 13 48 52 07709 D Tietjen 1864, Dec. 15 Bäcker. 1864, V. Dec. 27, 18 162 22 340 53 17 7 1'1145 R

Engelmann 1864, Dec. 30 Brulns. 1865,

8

1 253 3 87 32 o'0260 R Tebbutt 1865, Jan, 18 Moista. II. May 27, 23 158 8

334 37 13 4 0'3410 D V. Asten 1865, Jan. 25 D'Arrest 1866, I. Jan. II, 3

60 28 231 26 17 18 0'9765 R Oppolzer 1865, Dec. 19 Tempel 1866, II. Feb. 14, 0 50 0209 45

I'6822 D

Möller 1865, Aug. 22 Thiele.

II 22

21 16

1859,

50 16

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1871, 1871,

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1871,

1873, 1873, 1873, 1873,

1873,

1874,

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| 66 21

Year and Perihelion

Longi-
Longi-
tude of Inclina.
Peri.

Date of
Number of
Pasatie.
tude

helion
Ascend

Computer.
Greenwich of Peri-

Discoverer.

Dir. Comet.

tion.
ing

Discovery.
Mean Time, helion.

Node.

tance.
h.
1867, 1. Jan. 19, 21

75 52
78 36 18 13
1'5725 D

Searle 1867, Jan. 22 Coggia. 1867, II. May 23, 22 236 9

6 25
1'5636 D

Sauberg 1867, April 3 Tempel. 1867, III. Nov. 6, 23 213 36 64 59 96 34 °°3304

Oppolzer 1867, Sep. 26 Bäcker. 1863, 1. April 17, 10 116 3 IOI 14

29 22
0 5970

D Schulze 1869, April 1 Schmidt. 1863, II, June 25, 23287

8

53 40 48 12 0 5824 R Plummer 1868, Jue 13 Winnecke. 1863, III. Sep. 14, 15 158 11 334 32

V. Asten 13 7 0-3336 D

1868, July 17 Winnecko. 1869, I. June 29, 23 275 55 113 33

10 48 0 7815 D Oppolzer 1869, April ý Winnecke. 1869, II. Oct, 9, 20 139 43 311 30 III 40 12307 R

Dolerck 1869, Oct. 11 Tempel. 1869, III. Nov. 13, 19 42 58 296 44

$ 24, 1'0632 D

Schulhof 1869, Nov. 27 Tempel. 1870, 1. July 14, 2 303 32' 141 45 58 12

Tempel & | Seydler 1870, May 29

Winnecke. 1870, II, Sep. 2, 5

7 53
12 56 99 21
1*8167 D

Gerst 1870, Aug. 28 Coggia. 1870, III, Sep. 22, 17 318 41 146 25 15 39 12802 D

Levean 1870, Aug. 31 Winnecke. 1870, IV. Dec. 19, 21 9 94 45

32 44 0*3892 R

Schulhof 1870, Nov, 23 Winnecke. 1. June 10, 14 141 50 279 19

87 36 0-6543 D Holetschek 1871, April 7 Wimecke. II, July 27, I 115 34 211 54

78 1 1'0315 R

Crimer 1871, June 14 Tempel 1871, III, Nov. 30, II 116 5 269 18 54 17, 1'0301 D Tichler 1871, Oct. Borrelly. 1871, IV. Dec. 20, 9264 13 147

6

81 40 0-6914 R Lindungen 1871, Nov. 3 Tempel. V. Dec. 28, 20 158 13' 334 34 13 7

o'3330 D

V. Asten 1871, Sep. 9 Winnecke, I. May 9, 15 237 58 78 43

946 1*7728 D

Garutier 1873, April 3 Stephan. II. June 25, 9306 10 120 54

12 43 ( 1°3445 D

Plummer 1873, July 3 Teinpel.
III, July 18, 12
50 5 209 41 II 22

I'6823 D Möller 1873, Sep. 3 Stephan.
IV. Sep. 10, 19 36 48 23o 35 84 1 07941 R Gautier 1873, Aug. 20 Borrelly.
V. Oct.
1, 19 302 58 176 43 58 31 0'3849 R

Weiss 1873, Aug. 23 Henry. 1873, VI, Oct. 10, IT 116 6

IOI 16
29 23 0 5935 D

Plummer 1873, Aug. 31 Stephan. 1873. VII. Dec. 3, 3 85 30 248 37 26 29 0*7754 D

Weiss 1873, Nov. 10 Coggia. I. Mar. 9, 22 300 36 31 31 58 17 0*0439 D Schulhof 1874, Feh. 20 Winnecke. 1874, II. Mur, 13, 23 302 22 274 7 31 35 0 8857 R

Wenzel 1874, April 11 Winnecke. 1874, III, July 8, 21 271

6

06758 D

Hepperger 11874, April 17 Coggia. 1874, IV, July 17, 17 5 27 215 51 34 8 1'6881 D

Holetschek 1874, Aug. 19 Corria. V. Aug. 26, 20 344

9 251 29 41 51 0-9827 D Gruss 1874, July 25 Borrelly. VI, Oct. 18, 23265 41

281 58

80 47 0'5083 R Holetschek 1874, Dec. 6 Borrelly. I. Mar, 12, 3276 38 111 29 11 17 '0'8289 D Oppolzer 1875, Feb. Borrelly.

Holden & 1875, II. April 13, 3.158 22 334 41 13 7 0*3329 D V. Asten 1875, Jan. 26

Tuttle, 1877, I. Jan. 19, 4200 5 187 15 27 5 0·8074 R

Thrnen
1877, Feb.

8 Borrelly. II. April 17, 16 253 29 316 37 58 51 o'9499 R

Plinth 1877, April 5 Winnecke. III. April 26, 20, 102 52 346 4

i'oogo D

Zelbe 1877, April 11 Swift. 1877, IV. May 10, 8! 319 7 146 7

Loveau 15 43 13180 D

1877, July 9

Tempel &

Coggia. V. June 27, 2 81 2 184 17

64 15 1'1071 R Gruss 1877, Oct. Tempel. 1877, VI. Sep. 11, 10107 38 250 59 77 42

1'5768 R

Plummer 1877, Sep. 13 Coggia. 1878, I. July 20, 17 279 50 102 16 78 11

I'3919 D

Büttner 1878, July 7 Swift. 1878, II. July 26, 3 158 20 334 39 13 70'3329

D V. Asten 1878, Ang. 3 Tebbutt. 1878, III. Sep. 7, 6306 8 121 1

12 46 *3397

D Schulhof 1898, July 19 Tempel. 1. Mar. 30, 2 116 14

101 18
29 23 0-5899 D

Schulze 1879, Jun. 14 Tempel.
II. April 27, 10 42 45 46 72 58 0-8966 R Kremser

1879, June 16 Swift. 1679, III. Mily 10, 22 238 12

78 46
947 17694 D

Gautier 1879, April 24 Tempel.
IV. Aug. 24, 6, 308 12 32 22 72 15 09913 R Hartwig 1879, Ang. 24 Hartwig.
V. Oct.

4, 15 202 38 87 11 80*9897 D Pulisa 1879, Aug. 21 Palisa. I. Jan. 27, 11 278 23 356 17 52 o'0060 R W. Meyer 1880, Feb. 4

Gould. II. July I, 18 112 3 257 15 56 56 1'8143 R

J. Mayer 1880, April ó Schülerle. III. Sep. 6, 23 82 12 45 19 38 6 0'3546 R Molien 1880, Sep. 29 Hartwig. IV. Nov. 8, o 43 5 296 51

Schulhof 1880, Oct.

Swift. V. Nov. 9, 10 261 4 249 23 60 42 096596 D Bigourdan 1880, Dec. 16 Pechule. 1. Jun. 22, 16 50 50

209 36 11 20 1'7382 D Möller 1980, Aug. Common. II. May 11 300 12

77 58 0·5912 D

Gruss 1881, April 30 Swift. III. June 16, u 265 13 270 58 63 26 097345 D Bossert 1881, May 22 Tebbutt. IV. Aug. 22, 8 334 55 97 3 39 46 0-6336 R

Stechert 1881. July 14 Schäberle. V. Sep. 13, 11 18 36 65 52 6 50 07259 D Plummer

ct.

4 Denning. VI. Sep. 14, 9267 52 274 10 67 II

0'4492 R
Milloserich 18 1, Sep. 17

Barnard.

( Winnecke 1881, VII, Nov. 15, 2 158 30 334 34 12 53

Backlund 1831, Aug. 20

& Hartwig. 1881, VIII. Nov. 19, 14 63 31 181 18 149262 R | Bigonrılan 1881, Nov. 16 Swift. 1. June 10, 13 53 56 204 56 73 49 o'0608 D

Parson 1882, Mar. 17 Wells. II. Sep. 17, 6 276 25 346 38 o'0077, R

Kreutz 1882, Sep. 3 Severnl Obs. 1882, III. Nov. 13, o 354 48 249 7 83 51 0'9554 R Wolyncewicz 1882, Sep. 13 Barnard, I. Feb. 18, 23

29
3 278 8

78 3 0 7600 D Graham 1883, Fel), 23 Brooks. II. Dec. 25, 7. 125 46 264 25 65 1 o'3097

R Oppenheim 1884, Jan, 7

Ross.

1874, 1874, 1875,

I

1877, 1677,

77 10

1877,

2

1879, 1879,

I

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93 21

5 28

1884, 1884, 1885, 1885,

59 28

h.
1884,
1. Jan, 25, 17
254 9 74 3 0'7757

D
Il. Aug. 16, u 306 12 5 9

12794 D
III. Nov. 17, 18 19 3 206 22 25 15

1'5719 D
I. March 153 33 334 37 12 54

D
II. Aug. 10,2 246 58 204 40
1885,
JII. Sep. 11, 4, 116 29 269 42 54 20

D
1885, IV. Sep. 25, 4 293 13 93 30 75 33 2'2951
1885,
V. Nov. 24, 19296 39 262

25 1'0718 1886, I. April 5, 13 163 10 36 20

22 11

oʻ6368 1886, II. May 3, 5 188

2 | 68 20 84 20 04779 1886, III. May 4, 10 325 57 287 36 100 3 0·8418 1886, IV. June 6, 20 228 56 52

6

13 24 1*3596 1886, V. June 7, 11 33 53 192 48 87 45

o'2714 1886, VI.

275 4

101 56 14 171 1886, VII. Nov. 21, 0352 51 51 26 3 19

1'1445 1886, VIII. Dec. 16, 11 223 52 / 137 20 101 47 06604

2

Bruks, Barnard

Wolf. Tempel. Bruxika Perrutin, Barnard, Bruks,

Fabry. Barnatrul. Bruks Brooks Brooks

Schulhof 1884, Sep.

Egbert 1884, July 16
Krueger 1884, Sep. 17
Buckland 1884, Dec. 13

Lamp 1885, Aug. 31

Rahts 1885, Aug. 8
Holetschek 1885, July 9
Oppenheim 1885, Dec. 26
Oppenheim 1885, Dec. 1
Oppenheim 1885, Dec. 3
Oppenheim 1886, May 1
Oppenheim 1886, May 22
Oppenheim 1886, April 27,
Krenger 1886, Aug. 20

Boss 1856, Sep. 26
Oppenheim 1886, Oct. 5

Finlay. Barnarl,

Periodical Comets.

The following is a table of those periodical at least two returns to perihelion, and are folly comets which have been well observed during | recognized as belonging to our system :

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In addition to these the paths of many other of the chief instances of such periodical comets comets have exhibited decided evidences of as are awaiting confirmation. There are many ellipticity. Some of these will doubtless be re-others, especially of longer period, and malt observed, and their orbits and periods more in reference to which great uncertainty sil! exactly ascertainel during future returns to prevails, Those in the table are arrand perihelion. The following list comprises some according to the duration of their revolutionis.

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The shortest period of any known comet is 1880 I., and 1882 II. were at one tiine thing that of Encke, 3/3 years. The comet of 1744,

to be returns of the same body, in cause eitt | which exhibited seven tails, is computed to of suine orbital resemblances and their earth. have a period of no less than 122,683 years, Jously close approaches to the sun what

is while thit of 1844 11. is assumed to revolve in their perihelit. 102,052 years.

The great comets of 1680, 1843 I.,

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