The Cottagers of Glenburnie: A Tale for the Farmer's Ingle-nook

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Manners and Miller, 1822 - English fiction - 311 pages
 

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Page 145 - ... can make the mind of man to swell; for nothing can fill, much less extend, the soul of man, but God and the contemplation of God. And therefore Solomon, speaking of the two principal senses of inquisition, the eye and the ear, affirmeth that the eye is never satisfied with seeing, nor the ear with hearing; and if there be no fulness, then is the continent greater than the content.
Page 151 - I never heard o' sic a thing i' my life." Mrs Mason found it difficult to conceal the disgust which this discovery excited ; but resolving to be cautious of giving offence by the disclosure of her sentiments, she sat down in silence, to watch the further operations of the morning.
Page 299 - The flowers are a hantel bonnier than the midden though, and smell a hantel sweeter too, I trow,' returned Mrs Smith. This striking indication of a change of sentiment in the most sturdy stickler for the gude auld gaits, foreboded the improvements that were speedily to take place...
Page 103 - Ay, it's a bonny piece of corn, to be sure," returned Mrs Macclarty with great simplicity ; " but then, what with the trees, and rocks, and wimplings o' the burn, we have nae room to make parks o' ony size." " But were your trees, and rocks, and wimplings of the burn all removed," said Mr Stewart, " then your prospect would be worth the looking at, Mrs Macclarty ; would it not ?" Though Mr Stewart's irony was lost upon the good woman, it produced a laugh among the young folks, which she, however,...
Page 96 - Why, farmer," said Mr Stewart, " you have trusted rather too long to this rotten plank, I think" (pointing to where it had given way) ; " if you remember the last time I passed this road, which was several months since, I then told you that the bridge was in danger, and showed you how easily it might be repaired ?" " It is a' true," said the farmer, moving his bonnet ; " but I thought it would do weel eneugh.
Page 303 - Morrison had the heartfelt happiness of paying to his creditors the full amount of all he owed them ; and from that moment he seemed to enjoy the blessings of life with double relish. Mrs Mason, perceiving that his daughters were now qualified to succeed her in the charge of the school...
Page 101 - Macclarty, she now asked for the house of that worthy, and after a severe jolting from the badness of the road, was set down opposite his door. It must be confessed that the aspect of the dwelling where she was to fix her residence was by no means inviting. The walls were substantial — built of stone and lime — but they were blackened by the mud which the cart-wheels had spattered from the ruts in winter ; and on one side of the door they were covered from view by the contents of a large dunghill....
Page 266 - In one of the rooms the following card was hung up : ' It is requested that the following instructions be particularly observed by the children : — To do every thing in its proper time ; to keep every thing to its proper use ; and to put every thing in its proper place ; also that each fire may consume its own cinders.
Page 154 - ... Oh, but you mistake me,' said Mrs Mason. ' I intend that it should be fastened, when open, with an iron hook, as they constantly fasten the cottage windows in England.' 'And wha do ye think wad put in the cleek?' returned he. 'Is there ane, think ye, about this house that wad be at sic a fash?' 'Why, what trouble is there in it?" said Mrs Mason. 'It is only teaching your children to pay a little attention to such things, and they will soon come to find no trouble in them. They cannot too soon...
Page 101 - ... plentiful supply of water, in which they could swim without danger. Happily Mr Stewart was provided with boots, so that he could take a firm step in it, while he lifted Mrs Mason and set her down in safety within the threshold. But there an unforeseen danger awaited her; for there the great...

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