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Evelyn's remarks in his diary, who long enjoyed a close intimacy with Waller’s family, their domestic happiness was all that could be desired. The poetic temperament is not, perhaps, altogether the most suitable for increasing the pleasures of the married life, but Waller did not evince sufficient of that irritability of temper which is so frequently attendant upon a highly imaginative mind, as to render him a disagreeable husband or a morose companion. The fire of his genius was not so ardent, as to cause the heat of its passions to be intense or unbearable. He had no occasion like Milton to write a treatise upon the Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, nor was he like Byron interrupted by the visit of a physician to ascertain whether he was sane. Waller differed from Montaigne, who, upon becoming a widower, declared that “ he would not marry a second time, though the lady were Wisdom herself.

During the interval in which the King thought proper to dispense with the use of Parliaments, Waller being free from political duties, occupied his leisure by resorting to poetical composition. It was at this period that the poem on the Navy was written-a panegyric supposed to refer to that fleet which Charles fitted up with the famous Ship-Money, to chastise the Dutch for their daring encroachments upon the English fisheries. A fragment on the taking of Salle, a city in the province of Fez, infested by pirates, followed ; and subsequently, some lines upon the repairs of St. Paul's Cathedral, a work then being effected by means of the enormous fines which Laud was extorting from the disobedient Puritans in that arbitrary tribunal, the Star-Chamber. Lord Clarendon observes, “ Persons of honour were every day cited into the Star-Chamber, and there prosecuted to their shame and punishment; and as the shame was never forgiveu, but watched for revenge, so the fines imposed there were the more questioned and repined at, because they were assigned to the rebuilding and repairing of St. Paul's Church.” These poems all being dedicated to the King, prove that Waller had not yet deserted the Court, or joined that vigorous opposition to the crown which was fast ripening into rebellion and civil war.

Some verses which Waller addressed to Van Dyck the celebrated painter, were also written about this period. Judging from the familiar manner in which the poet compliments and flatters the artist, we may presume they were accustomed to associate in some of the literary circles of the day. Perhaps, Van Dyck had painted Sacharissa, for in this epistle, Waller evidently appears to refer to the Penshurst beauty,

when he says,

“Another, who did long refrain,

Feels his old wound bleed fresh again,
With dear remembrance of that face,

Where now he reads new hope of grace.” Before the King's finances had become hopelessly embarrassed, by his determined opposition to the Parliament, he had been enabled to bestow a considerable amount of patronage upon the fine arts, in a manner calculated to improve the taste of the people, as well as to encourage and emulate national talent. Horace Walpole admits, that from the accession of Charles I., we must date the first era of true taste in England. Henry VIII. invited Holbein to his Court. Elizabeth and her Maids of Honour sat to Zucchero. James condescended to entertain Rubens, and talk pedantry with Inigo Jones; but it was reserved for Charles to bring a critical judgment, a correct erudition, and a discerning taste to the task of appreciating genius, and recognising true art. Under the patronage of James, Inigo Jones had reared the stately palace of Whitehall, while Rubens had adorned its walls with his unrivalled skill. Charles purchased the collection of pictures belonging to the Duke of Mantua, then one of the most considerable in Europe, and invited foreign artists to assist him in diffusing taste among his subjects. Many noblemen emulated their royal master in his taste for the arts. The Duke of Buckingham, Lord Arundel, Lord Falkland, and Sir Kenelm Digby were each famed, either for their generous patronage, or zealous exertion in the cause of art. At the suggestion of Sir Kenelm, Charles was on the point of giving Van Dyck a commission to embellish the Banquetting Room at Whitehall, in order that it might become a worthy rival of the Louvre. The painter required £80,000; the King demurred; they separated—the one to die, the other to undergo trials worse than death itself.

Several poems addressed to Lucy, Countess of Carlisle, show that Waller was among the numerous admirers of that gifted but dangerous beauty. In one of these pieces, he aspires to perform knight service for this lady, as her champion, by using the weapon of ing from the disobedient Puritans in that arbitrary tribunal, the Star-Chamber. Lord Clarendon observes, “ Persons of honour were every day cited into the Star-Chamber, and there prosecuted to their shame and punishment; and as the shame was never forgiven, but watched for revenge, so the fines imposed there were the more questioned and repined at, because they were assigned to the rebuilding and repairing of St. Paul's Church.” These poems all being dedicated to the King, prove that Waller had not yet deserted the Court, or joined that vigorous opposition to the crown which was fast ripening into rebellion and civil war.

Some verses which Waller addressed to Van Dyck the celebrated painter, were also written about this period. Judging from the familiar manner in which the poet compliments and flatters the artist, we may presume they were accustomed to associate in some of the literary circles of the day. Perhaps, Van Dyck had painted Sacharissa, for in this epistle, Waller evidently appears to refer to the Penshurst beauty,

when he says,

Another, who did long refrain,

Feels his old wound bleed fresh again,
With dear remembrance of that face,

Where now he reads new hope of grace.” Before the King's finances had become hopelessly embarrassed, by his determined opposition to the Parliament, he had been enabled to bestow a considerable amount of patronage upon the fine arts, in a manner calculated to improve the taste of the people, as well as to encourage and emulate national talent. Horace Walpole admits, that from the accession of Charles I., we must date the first era of true taste in England. Henry VIII. invited Holbein to his Court. Elizabeth and her Maids of Honour sat to Zucchero. James condescended to entertain Rubens, and talk pedantry with Inigo Jones; but it was reserved for Charles to bring a critical judgment, a correct erudition, and a discerning taste to the task of appreciating genius, and recognising true art. Under the patronage of James, Inigo Jones had reared the stately palace of Whitehall, while Rubens had adorned its walls with his unrivalled skill. Charles purchased the collection of pictures belonging to the Duke of Mantua, then one of the most considerable in Europe, and invited foreign artists to assist him in diffusing taste among his subjects. Many noblemen emulated their royal master in his taste for the arts. The Duke of Buckingham, Lord Arundel, Lord Falkland, and Sir Kenelm Digby were each famed, either for their generous patronage, or zealous exertion in the cause of art. At the suggestion of Sir Kenelm, Charles was on the point of giving Van Dyck a commission to embellish the Banquetting Room at Whitehall, in order that it might become a worthy rival of the Louvre. The painter required £80,000; the King demurred; they separated—the one to die, the other to undergo trials worse than death itself.

Several poems addressed to Lucy, Countess of Carlisle, show that Waller was among the numerous admirers of that gifted but dangerous beauty. In one of these pieces, he aspires to perform knight service for this lady, as her champion, by using the weapon of

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