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RESOURCES. Loans and discounts..

$203,462,460 Overdrafts....

668,495 Due from banks.

21,949,185 Due from directors.

$6,672,010 Due from brokers..

14,722,542 Real estate..

8,865.541 Specie.

81,071,759 Cash items...

63,253,433 Stocks, promissory and U.S. 7 3-10 notes

and indebtedness certificates...... 120,856,200 Bonds and mortgages....

5,579,543 Bills of solvent banks and U S. demand notes...

28,746,183 Bills of suspended banks. $78 and

229 Loss and expense account.

771,248 Add for cents...

948

$183,647,488

463,785

22,404,378 $6,198,672 6,311,600 11,300 and 8,972,098

40,250,309 48,482,170

109,491,478 $86,000 and 5,731,618

16,790,539 $65 and 246

1,191,229

918

Total......

$475,125,227

$486,419,685 In September Ihree hundred and nine banks were in operation and reported, including the Pulaski Bank, which is voluntarily winding up its affairs.

The Bank of Canton, Lake Bank, Henry D. Barto & Co.'s Bank, and 0. Paddock & Co.'s Bank, made their first reports.

The Perrin Bank, Rochester, is voluntarily winding up, and did not report.

The Hope Bank, of Albany, commenced operations since last report, but not in time to be included in the September report.

To show the remarkable changes in the returns during the war, we give the movement since September, 1861, in the four principal items of the quarterly report: Date Circulation, Deposits.

Specie.

Discounts. September, 1861.... $28,016,748 $111,896,016 $38,089,727 $176,055,848 March, 1862.. 28,330,973 121,988,259 34,301,092 162,017,987 June,

33,727,382 150,438,244 82,882,693 184,501,261 September, 1862... 37,557,373 186,390,796 39,283,931 165,584,063 December, 1862... 39,182,819 191,637,897 87,803,047 178,922,536 March,

36,506,606 221,644,847 38,802,438 183,864,089 June, 1863... 32,261,462 218,717,725 40,250,809 183,617,488 September, 1863.... 33,423,230 233,611,282 81,071,759 203,462,460

1862....

1868....

DIVIDENDS OF THE PHILADELPHIA BANKs.—The Philadelphia banks, with the exception of the Bank of North America, (which makes it dividends in January and July,) declared their semi-annual dividend the first of the month, and the Commercial List and Price Current of Philadelphia gives the following statement of these November dividends, compared with those of May last :

Amount of Banks.

Capital stock.

When declared. dividend. Philadelphia ..

$1,800,000 May 5 Nov, 5

$90,000 Farmers and Mechanics

2,000,000 4

5 100,000 Commercial..

1,000,000

5 50,000 Mechanics'.

800,000 5

6. 48,000 Northern Liberties..

500,000 7

7 35,000 Southwark..

250,000 7

8 20,000 Kensington..

250,000 5 10 25,000 Penn Township.

350,000 6

6 21,000 Western....

418,600 5

5 21,900

66

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Total. .....
$11,985,380

$581,725 The dividends for the November semi-annual period have been generally increased, and all are payable clear of tax. The amount of dividends is $581,725, against $512,438 at the semi-annual period in May, being an increase of $59,287.

REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE, AND SEPTENNIAL ASSESSMENT, OF PhilaDELPHIA.—The Philadelphia Commercial List also publishes the following statement of the value of the real and personal property of Philadelphia which has just been returned by the assessors, for the year 1864 :

REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE.

Furniture.

$600

.

Wards.

1.... 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

400 1,600 97,700 32,250 354,750 684,700 242,450 195,660

2,800 80,600 116,190 29,500 29,800 4,400

10...

Real estate.
$5,726,239
3,329,925
2,555,802
2,986,594
12,805,665
20,504,920

7,525,686
13,060,303
11,159,375
8,149,888
4,599,270
4,092,836
5,343,425
5,187,460
7,583,849
3,092,325
2,041,311
2,794,031
4,099,600
6,795,809
3,232,978
4,901,594
3,471,252
5,569,237
3,058,994

11. 12. 13. 14. 16. 16. 17..

Horses, etc. $16,085

5,855 1,260 1,000 9,480 3,070 10,835 49,465 29,775 26,490

9,930 10,955 4,100 5,185 25,395 4,370 6,950 9,640 15,210 35,930 27,875 70,875 56,310 79,926 13,940

Carriages.

*825 2,060

30 450 9,240 1,720 8,375 31,800 18,150 21,610 1,070 7,030 3,115 2,355 2,900 1,120 1,320 1,650

210 6,120 3,055 23,375 10,430 7,073 2,100

Personal. $7,286 5,469 3,152 3,610 3,071 2,901 4,257 3,619 3,588 4,340 3,440 2,234 3,630 4,261 5,923 4,199 4,372 4,613 6,506 7,023 3,157 4,166 3,662 4,530 2,305

18....

200

19...

20... 21. 22. 23. 24. 25

57,600
13,900
69,425
14,700
25,420
5,150

$153,668,368 $2,059,795 $529,896 $167,273 $106,314

1....

The above valuation is exclusive of property exempt by law. The assessed value of property returned as rural amounts to about $18,000,000.

The returns of the taxable inhabitants of Philadelphia has also been made by the assessors, under the direction of the City Commissioner, in accordance with the act of 1821. The following are the complete returns to be sent to Harrisburg for the purpose of fixing the number of representatives for 1864 :

Deaf and

Total Wards.

Males. Females. Blind. Dumb. Whites. Colored. Taxables.

7,384 334 2 2 7,619 99 7,718 2. 5,573 504 10 6 6,049 28

6,077 3.

3,039
152 1 1 3,177 14

3,191 4.

3,012 19 1 0 3,030 1 • 3,031 5

2,088
186 1 0 3,158 16

3,174 6

2,692 111 3 2 2,803 0 2,803 7...

4,978
418 2 3 5,306 90

5,396 8.

4,007

723
6
4,655

4,730 4,025 1,158 5 1 5,143 40 5,183 10.

4,319
282 2 1 4,596 5

4,601 11...

3,301

52 2 3 3,352 1 3,353 3,307 164

3 3,466 5 3,471 13.

3,807 559 3 0 4,366 0 4,366 ,4,502 198 1 7 4,696

4 4,700 15.

7,151 555 20 3 7,703 3 7,706 16.

4,706 293 3 4 4,998 1 4,999 17. 4,769 54

4,822 1 4,823 18.... 4,608 132

5 3 4,740 0 4,740 19.

6,80

474 5 4 7,270 11 7,281 20....

7,218
522 8 3 7,732 9

7,741 21. 3,578 299 4

·3,875 2 3,877 22....

4,286 249 3 0 4,524 11
3,906 314

11
4 4,191 59

4,250 24.

5,055 215 4 1 5,234 36 5,270 25.

2,159 98 1 0 2,248 9 2,257

75

19.

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4,535

23.

111,117 . 8,096 107 52 118,753 520 119,273 The return of blind and deaf and dumb in the various institutions in that city, not included in the above, is as follows: In the Blind Asylum, there are 86 males and 75 females ; in the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 97 males and 88 females ; at the Aimshouse, tbere are 45 blind anıl 5 deaf and dumb.

STATISTICS OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

FOREIGN WOOL TRADE OF NEW YORK.

The Journal of Commerce publishes the following statement of the imports of foreign wool at New York for the first six months of the current year, and also for the same time in 1862. The comparison shows the imports of the first half of this year to be more than those of the same time in 1862 by 27,094 bales, 11,509,348 pounds, and $2,081,056 in value. At this time last year nearly all the new clip of domestic wool had been bought of the growers at 35 @ 45 cents, the latter figures being the price at that date, and foreign wools were held at prices which made them dearer than domestic. But at this date the facts are reversed. The new clip is nearly all held by the grower at 65 @ 75 cents, and the stock of foreign is offered at rates which make it cheaper to the manufacturer. And as there are few woolen fabrics which cannot be manufactured from foreign stock, but little domestic will be taken while the present prices remain. The stock of foreign wool in this market at the present time is considerably larger than that of this date a year ago, and it is estimated that the domestic clip of this year is fully twenty-five per cent larger than that of 1862 :

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN WOOL AT NEW YORK DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 1862,

AND FOR THE SAME TIME IN 1863.

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--1862.

--1868.-No. of Weight Entered

No. of

Weight Entered bales. of pounds. value. bales. of pounds. value. 16,388 5,734,308 $1,041,135 18,902 7,065,474 $1,292,899 4,967 4,384,295 617,298 9,421 8,196,049 1,192,162 8,208 3,203,806 451,636 15,152 4,418,399 768,083 1,679 586,361 121,497 6,933 2,449,363 458,183 54 19,285 3,228 2,155 941,319 167,670

1,817 778,034 160,730

3,160 757,446 143,643 2,561 974,542 161,908 1,081 846,714 140,446

1,891 790,198 116,251 12 2,225

864 1,726 569,148 74,202 459 306,790 46,654 678 * 464,813 64,268 419 127,313 14,988 749 222,074 85,817 207 55,677 8,471 728 183,886 22,219 242 111,400 18,236 238

86,340 21,487 293 84,495 14,979 125 67,099 10,292 568 224,228 26,733 161 69,785 9,620

72 49,659 7,769 621 163,866 17,946 140 26,911 4,855 10 3,800

819 48 20,231 2,725

46 14,746 2,677

39 20,844 2,287 661 202,200 26,841 55 16,740 2,033 882 80,738 13,304 29 8,281 1,059

6 2,772

666 165 92,664 9,634

3
460

46
339 90,983 11,942
65 39,701 4,668

8,211 1,093 1

348

China.......

Sardinia
Gibraltar.
Malta....
Ouba.
Central America....
British West Indies..
Montevideo.
Bombay....

12

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THE IRON TRADE FOR THE YEAR 1862.

During the year 1862, prices in irons of all kinds were marked by a continually upward movement. This movement had none of the feverish excitement which characterized those of tin and copper. It slowly followed, indeed, the advance in gold, but it derived its chief impetus from the progress of the demand, arising from government consumption, and from the general revival of trade. It was, therefore, for the times, healthily and steadily moved forward through the season, unchecked by the temporary events or contingencies of the year. The restrictions to exportations hither, on English account, induced by the uncertainty of American politics, and the fluctuations of gold and exchange, tended greatly to the benefit of the American iron master, and gave him a fair start for that race of competition with England which must ensue in future years. These circumstances yielded to him a control of the home markets at a time of immense demand, and at prices the most liberally profitable. They secured to him an accumulation of capital to fall back upon in less prosperous times.

The trade of the year was done mostly for cash ; credit, indeed, was seldom asked for. During the summer months, the Pennsylvania trade, at a meeting, resolved thereafter to shorten the time on cash bills to ten days, and on time bills to four months, from date of invoices. This was followed by similar action on the part of the trade here, except in Scotch pig irons, where, by the action of the leading house in the trade, the effort was made unavailing. Scotch pig irons are, therefore, sold at six months, or for cash.

The high prices of the past year have stimulated to the utmost the production of all kinds of iron. Old furnaces, rolling-mills and forges are put, or being put, into a condition for the most active operation; new ones are projected in various parts of the country, and many are near completion. The home supplies of iron will, in the course of a year or so, equal any demand. With the competition of English irons they may largely exceed the demand. That competition cannot, with our present tariff

, be shut.out, nor is it likely or desirable that any alteration in the latter will be made. The American iron master must, therefore, look, to insure his success, to the quality, uniformity, and evenness of size and gauge of his iron, and, above all, to their being carefully examined before being put in the market.

Pig Irons.-At the close of the year 1861, the surplus stocks of foundry, and, to a considerable extent, those of forge pig irons, were in speculators' bands.

The year 1862 opened with prices of No. 1, extra foundry, at $20 cash, forge at $18 to $20 cash, and Scotch pig irons at $22 cash, with little disposition on the part of consumers or of the trade to buy at these fig. ures, beyond their more immediate wants. Indeed, many were convinced of a gradual decline in prices to the lowest points of the previous year ; and this, notwithstanding the increasing demand, the absence of foreign coinpetition, and the probable inflation of the currency. These views somewbat curtailed the spring demand for pig irons in the East, and buyers, for the most part, bought only for the present. In the West, however, contracts were made more freely.

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