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DESCRIPTION OF IMPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30TH.

1861.
1862.

1863. Dry goods....

$83,310,345 $38,155,720 $61,963,037 General merchandise.. 107,015,754 94,113,327 116,913,338 Specie and bullion...

34,075,161 11,691,300 1,731,490

Total imports......... $224,401,260 $143,960,347 $180,607,865

IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK FOR THE YEAR ENDING WITH JUNE.

1862.

1863. Manufactures of wool.......

$18,052,168 $26,653,850 cotton..

6,033,980 8,474,908 silk..

8,139,932 13,412,250 flax...

4,328,781 10,012,580 Miscellaneous dry goods.

1,600,859 3,409,449

Total imports...

$38,155,720 $61,963,037 As the trade in each of the last three years has been affected by our domestic troubles, we have thrown together the corresponding totals since 1850, which will be found very interesting as showing the progress of this branch of commerce for thirteen years :

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK.
Value Imported.

Value imported. 1850-51.... $64,613,747 1857–58...

$67,317,736 1851-52. 57,221,062 1858–59.

93,549,083 1852–53. 79,192,513 1859–60.

107,843,205 1853–54. 92,389,627 1860–61.

83,310,345 1854-55. 62,918,443 1861-62.

38,155,720 1855-56. 85,898,690 1862–63.

61,963,037 1856–57..

92,669,088 The above shows that if we except last year, we must go back over ten years to find another total as small as for the year just closing. Some will regard this as an evidence of prosperity, on the old high tariff theory that when more goes out of a country than comes back, then the balance of trade is in our favor.

The revenue for customs shows a relative loss, the total gain in receipts being far less than the comparative gain in the dutiable imports. We annex the total for the month, for six months, and for the fiscal year:

REVENUE FROM CUSTOMS AT NEW YORK.

1861.
1862.

1863. In June......

$885,062 41 $4,664,927 19 $3,738,934 06 Previous five months.. 9,700,272 54 20,398,460 89 20,104,143 91

Total in six months. 10,585,334 95 $25,063,388 08 $23,843,077 97 Total fiscal year.... 28,223,137 16 36,193,034 43 51,033,806 61

The exports of produce and merchandise from New York in June, show a gain of about 50 per cent in the nominal value over the corresponding total for last year :

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE.

Domestic produce.....
Foreign merchandise (free). .
Foreign merchandise (dut'ble)
Specie and bullion.

1861.
1862.

1863.
$10,270,430 $10,048,832 $14,780,072
648,482

43,368 49,380 903,877 372,561 298,067 244,242 9,867,614 1,367,774

Total exports..... $12,067,031 $20,332,375 $16,495,293 Total exclusive of specie.. 11,822,789 10,464,761 15,127,519

The shipments of specie are far less than for June of last year, that total being the largest of any similar month in our history. The following will show the relative exports from New York during the last six months :

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR SIX MONTHS FROM

JANUARY 1st.
1861.
1862.

1863. Domestic produce...

$61,477,439 $59,005,373 $87,793,188 Foreign goods (free)...... 1,685,329 318,336 556,351 Foreign goods (dutiable)... 3,438,463 2,550,203 3,312,095 Specie and bullion...

3,249,438 27,976,351 20,631,967

Total exports..... $69,850,669 $89,850,263 $112,293,601 Total exclusive of specie.. 66,601,231 61,873,912 91,661,634

We also bring forward our totals from the previous July-as the month of June completes the United States fiscal year. The total for the year is the largest ever on record. The previous year was tbe highest point then reached, and this exceeds that by upwards of $50,000,000, without reckoning the gain in specie. EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END

ING JUNE 30TH.
1861.
1869.

1863. Domestic produce.... $118,19,873 $128,763,929 $177,967,406 Foreign goods (free)...

2,224,564 787,954 3,091,863 Foreign goods (dutiable)

6,111,228 4,315,699 5,663,275 Specie and bullion..

23,860,857 28,966,163 52,092,637

Total exports....

$150,386,522 $162,830,745 $238,815,181 Total exclusive of specie.. 126,525,665 133,867,582 186,722,544

These statements have been waited for with much interest, as many are much interested in making up the balance of trade with a view of anticipating the course of exchange. We furnish the figures and leave the deductions to others. The imports are valued by an arbitrary standard, which, in most cases, is a little below the specie basis. The reports of produce and merchandise have been reckoned by their paper or purchasable value. The total of each is taken from the sworn entries at the custom-house, and in this sense the figures are official, and must therefore agree exactly with the government returns.

It has occurred to us as a matter of no little interest to make an examination into the relative business by American and foreign vessels, to see how

far the trade under the Federal flag has been affected by our domestic troubles, and the consequent "perils of the sea." We find that the change has been very important, as shown in the following comparison between the entire business of the year 1859 and the year 1862, at this port: FOREIGN COMMERCE OF 1859 AND 1862 AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

In American vessels. In foreign vossels. Imports from foreign ports.

$139,505,156 $104,549,748 Exports to foreign ports......

73,471,927 63,274,900 Total trade of 1859.

$213,977,083 $167,824,648 Imports from foreign ports.

$66,856,292 $106,630,141 Exports to foreign ports.. .

83,321,296 133,094,774 Total trade of 1862.....

$150,177,588 $239,724,915 The totals bere given are made up in a different method from the regular monthly summaries, and give the trade by arrivals and departures instead of the trade by entries at the custom-house. This will explain the discrepancies in the returns ; but this record is also official, and more convenient for reference. It shows a very great change in the business of the port. In 1859, the commerce by American vessels exceeded that by foreign vessels to the amount of $44,000,000. In 1862, this was reversed ; and the commerce by foreign flags exceeded that by our own flag to the amount of $89,000,000. A considerable part of this change must be owing to the greater employment of American ships as government transports; part of it is also due to the fact that much of the importing business is done by the steamers, now all under the foreign flag; and still another reason for the change may be found in a covering transfer of vessels to a foreign flag for convenience and safety. But after making every allowance for these influences, it must be evident that the fear of depredations on our commerce, by the Confederates and privateers, has driven a large portion of our foreigo trade to neutral vessels. We believe that the change here set forth has been greater than was generally expected, and we shall be surprised if it does not attract the serious attention of our Chamber of Commerce. It may be that the head of our Navy Department realizes these facts, and is making vigorous efforts to protect the commerce under our flag; but there has been at times an appearance of indifference at Washington, which, to those who are vitally interested in these changes, seemed quite inexplicable. At any rate, the shipowners cannot be too earnest in calling attention to this important statement.

PETROLEUM FROM JANUARY 1ST TO JUNE 30TH. The wonderful growth of the petroleum trade may be best understood by an examination of the following table, showing the amount exported the first balf of the years 1861, 1862, and 1863. This table is prepared by the editor of the Philadelphia Coal Oil Circular, a very reliable publication.

The daily production of oil in the Pennsylvania districts is from five to six thousand barrels. The subsidence or cessation of old wells is almost invariably cotemporaneous with the striking of new ones, of greater or lesser capacity, so that the average daily flow remains unchanged. Drilling is prosecuted without intermission in almost every direction, and

Crude.

new sources of oil are likely to be discovered almost any hour. Many of the large wells have, however, fallen off largely in their yield, frequently affected by proximate wells, whose flow seems to appreciate in proportion.

The stock of oil on the creek is not accumulating to any great extent, unless it be at the mouth. This latter is not, however, on the market, but is awaiting a rise in the Alleghany River for shipment to Pittsburg. It is, moreover, to a great extent already contracted for to Pittsburg refiners

. The tankage capacity on the creek is vast, but, as yet, many of the tanks remain empty. At the "new well” oil is taken away as fast it as flows from the ground, teamers frequently being compelled to wait awhile, until the first receiving tank shall have accumulated a sufficient quantity from which to fill their empty barrels.

The demand for oil at the wells is active, and prices are decidedly firm. On the creek oil brings readily $3 50 @ $375, some holders asking $4. Empty barrels are quickly taken at $3. The stock of “empties” is, however, much larger than has been generally reported, both at Titusville and at the wells. Teaming is firm at $1 the barrel. Oil delivered on the cars at Titusville, in barrels, finds a ready market at $8. Buyers at these quotations are at present more numerous than sellers. PRICES CURRENT OF ACTUAL SALES OF CRUDE AND REFINED PETROLEUM IN NEW YORK EACH MONTH DURING THE FIRST HALF YEAR OF 1863.

Refined.

Refined, bond, January 31st....

221 @ 25 39 @ 471 36 @ 40 February 28th

22 @ 221 40 @ 45 35 @ 40 March 28th

21 @ 211 37 @ 40 30 @ 35 April 25th

221 @ 24 42 @ 46 32] @ 371

25 @ 271 48 @ 52 40 @ 43 June 27th..

30 @ 31 60 @ 65 50 @ 51 The following is the table referred to above: EXPORTS OF PETROLEUM FROM THE UNITED STATES DURING THE FIRST HALF YEAR OF 1863, 1862, AND 1861. 1863. 1862.

1861. Acapulco...

700 Africa..

3,870
345

85 Alicante.

18,000 Antwerp.

1,482,593 127,234

101 Argentine Republic..

13,850 2,540 1,600 Arroyo, P. R...

500 Australia

416,904 210,940 41,953 Babia....

6,000 Bárbadoes

33,335 1,090 Belgium

125,174 Bombay.

7,000

300 Bordeaux

200

594 Brazil,

89,143 15,942

250 Bremen

899,633 21,770 2,125 British Guiana..

14,692
5,941

400 British Provinces

80,925 1,000 Buenos Ayres

32,000 1,000

5,000 1,000 Callao.

21,000

May 30th

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Calcutta...

1861.

Canary Islands.....
Cape Good Hope.
Cape Town...!
Cape Verde..
Cardenas.
Central America...
Cette.
Chili..
China.
Cisplatine Republic.
Cienfuegos....
Constantinople.

200 100

Cork....

30,065

11,915

1863. 1868.

160 8,500 2,000 1,000

10 30,210

2,059

2,700 41,440 16,800 15,314 1,000 99,145 3,389

410 3,500 749,948 170,411 297,401

205,328 46,000

200
200

250
389,108
3,990

467 650,643 140,753 178,312

117 188,807 18,206 287,272 963,177 118,997

44,562 930,093 391,618 16,997 3,097

940 110,400

1,000 4,492 2,000 8,480 31,449

3,600 3,912,818 1,656,893 2,129,699 1,102,877

120 672,470 51,735 195

60 5,331 1,000 2,050 36,199 3,456 48,849 84,773 14,232 7,180 2,139 3,500 7,850

2,740

Cuba
Dieppe
Dominica .
East Indies.
Falmouth.
Fayal...
Flores.
France...
Genoa.
Gibraltar
Glasgow.
Grangemouth.
Hamburg.
Havana.
Havre.
Hayti...
Honduras .
Ireland.
Jamaica .
Kingston..
Kurachee.
Laguaуга.
Leghorn...
Lisbon...
Liverpool....
London..
Malaga.
Marseilles.
Martinique.
Matanzas..
Mauritius .
Mayaguez.
Mexico..
Montevideo....
New Grenada
New Zealand...
Oporto
Otago...

4,010

100

11,680 16,376

120 125

200

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