Pictorial History of China and India: Comprising a Description of Those Countries and Their Inhabitants from the Earliest Period of Authentic Record, to the Present Time

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Robert Sears
R. Sears, 1851 - China - 592 pages

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Page 351 - IT IS TRUE, I CANNOT PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF THE FLOWING POISON; GAIN-SEEKING AND CORRUPT MEN WILL, FOR PROFIT AND SENSUALITY, DEFEAT MY WISHES ; BUT NOTHING WILL INDUCE ME TO DERIVE A REVENUE FROM THE VICE AND MISERY OF MY PEOPLE.
Page 572 - Delhi, until, in 1739, the empire received its fatal blow from the invasion of Nadir Shah. Among the spoils of conquest which the Persian warrior carried back with him in triumph to Khorassan, and which have been variously estimated as worth from...
Page 349 - The pain they suffer when deprived of the drug, after long habit, no language can explain ; and it is only when to a certain degree under its influence that their faculties are alive. In the...
Page 572 - June, 1813, was fixed as the day when the great diamond of the Moguls should be surrendered by the Abdallee chief to the ascendant dynasty of the Singhs. The two princes met in a room appointed for the purpose, and took their seats on the ground. A solemn silence then ensued, which continued unbroken for an hour. At length Runjeet's impatience overcame the suggestions of Asiatic decorum, and he whispered to an attendant to quicken the memory of the Shah. The exiled prince spoke not a word in reply,...
Page 349 - ... office. A few days of this fearful luxury, when taken to excess, will give a pallid and haggard look to the face ; and a few months, or even weeks, will change the strong and healthy man into little better than an idiot skeleton. The pain they suffer when deprived of the drug, after long habit, no language can explain...
Page 193 - Chinese regard it as one of their richest and most beautiful cities, and have a saying, " that to be happy on earth, one must be born in Soochow-foo, live in Canton, and die in Liauchau ;" for in the first are the handsomest people, in the second the richest luxuries, and in the third the best coffins.
Page 202 - ... dollars, and are retained in bondage until worn out by disease and profligacy ; they are then turned adrift by their vile owners, with scarcely sufficient covering for their bodies to protect them from the weather, or answer the purpose of common decency.
Page 348 - I had the curiosity to visit, was the opium-smoker in his heaven ; and certainly it is a most fearful sight, although perhaps not so degrading to the eye as the drunkard from spirits, lowered to the level of the brute and wallowing in his filth. The...
Page 189 - Peking are seldom more than one story in height, and have flat roofs, which are often covered with flowers and shrubs ; for as there are no fire-places, so there are no chimneys, the rooms being warmed by pans of lighted charcoal, of which fuel great quantities are brought from Tartary on dromedaries, and these animals are constantly seen thus laden in the streets of the city. The new town was partly built, and greatly embellished, by the Emperor...
Page 591 - The consequence of my long and uninterrupted researches into religious truth (he says in this letter) has been, that I have found the doctrines of Christ more conducive to moral principles, and better adapted for the use of rational beings, than any other which have come to my knowledge...

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