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histories. If any inaccuracies have crept into this volume they may be attributed to this phase of the work. Every statute passed by the Legislatures of the State of New York since the session of February, 1778, down to and inclusive of enactments of the Legislature of 1921, has been carefully read. The statutory record of Unconsolidated Laws, prepared by Hon. Adolph J. Rodenbeck in 1911, and the original records of the Board of Statutory Consolidation created by the Laws of 1904, have been consulted, both to insure the accuracy of this Digest and to present it in a form similar to the volumes prepared by the Board of Statutory Consolidation.

Many of the unrepealed special statutes which have been digested in this volume are in fact obsolete. However, they may have some historical value and to omit them might affect the completeness of the work. It need hardly be stated that provisions of the Consolidated Laws affecting New York City are not included in this Digest.

The Legislative Committee and its counsel wish to express their appreciation of the services of Mr. James M. Angle of Rochester, in assembling, indexing and editing the data which is presented in this Digest. Assistance and suggestions in planning the work were also generously given by the Hon. Adolph J. Rodenbeck, Hon. Frederick E. Wadhams, Hon. Edward J. McGoldrick and Hon. William F. McCormack.

The New York Charter Commission, appointed by Governor Miller, pursuant to Chapter 343 of the Laws of 1921, and its counsel, believing that this work might be of value in the preparation of a new Charter for the City of New York, secured from the State an appropriation for the purpose of editing and publishing this work.

The members of the Commission were: TRANCIS M. SCOTT, Chairman,

Louis L. DELAFIELD, JOHN F. HYLAN, Vayor,

JOSEPHI LEVINE, CHARLES L. CRAIG, Comptroller,

HOWARD LEE McBAIN, EDWARD RIEGELMANN, President, Bor HERMAN A. METZ, ouch of Brooklyn,

WILLIAM BARCLAY PARSONS, JOHN J. KELLER, Alderman,

FRANK L. POLK, EDWARD M. BASSETT,

ARTHUR S. SOMERS, GEORGE CROMWELL,

H. PUSHAE WILLIAMS,

l'pon the death of Hon. Francis M. Scott, Chairman, Governor Miller named in his place Henry De Forest Baldwin who was subsequently elected Chairman. The Commission selected as its counsel Hon. Edward J. McGoldrick. The work of the Legislative Committee, originally named to prepare this Digest, was brought to its completion and the result of its labors is presented in this volume, through the aid and co-operation of the New York Charter Commission.

Dated, New York, October 1, 1922.

Counsel Hox. JEREMIAJI WOOD, VINCENT L. LEIBELL.

Committce
Hon. THOMAS H. CULLEN,
HON, ALMET W. HUFF.

STATUTES NOT SPECIFICALLY REPEALED

Year

Ch.

Subject

1778

1779

1780

1780

38 2, 3..... Poor, care of, Westchester Co.

Revolutionary War act relating to poor removed from

New York City.
16* all...... Night watch, Westchester Co.

This act applies and extends to Westchester Co., L. 1778, ch. 6 (second session), an act to establish a night watch by the militia in Ulster, Tryon, Charlotte, Dutchess and Albany Counties. Both acts were amended by L. 1780, ch. 12 (fourth session). This amending act was repealed

by L, 1781, ch. 1 (fifth session). 59* all...... Oath of allegiance, Westchester Co.

This act extended the time in which the oath of allegiance required by a Convention resolution, passed 27 Dec. 1776, might be taken. It is a Revolutionary War

measure.
68* all...... Poor, care of, Westchester Co.

This act provided for the care and maintenance of poor persons and provided for a tax. It was affected by L. 1784, ch. 35. This was an act for the settlement and relief of the poor, and was of general application. Both L. 1780, ch. 68 (third session), and L. 1784, ch. 35, were affected by L. 1788, ch. 62, an act for the better settlement and relief of the poor. The last section of this act provides “ That all former acts and laws of the late colony of New York, and of this state, relating to the settlement and relief of the poor, and every matter, article and thing therein contained, be, and the same hereby are severally repealed.” Residence gained by poor persons, and moneys heretofore directed to be raised for the support of the poor were excepted from the operation

of the repeal.
37 6-8..... Guard house, tax for repairing, Westchester Co.

This act provides for a tax to be levied on the county for repairing a log house used as a guard house for

prisoners of war. Revolutionary War provision. 38 all...... Persons and property, protection of, Westchester Co.

Revolutionary War provision. The northerly portion of the county was debatable territory and lying contigu. ous to the part occupied by the British forces, the inhabi. tants were exposed to raids and robberies. Not infrequently the offenders came from the American side of

the lines.
52 all...... Highways and private roads, Westchester Co.

This act provides for laying out, regulating and keeping in repair common and public highways and private roads in Ulster, Orange, Dutchess, Washington, Westchester, Albany and Montgomery Counties. By L. 1785, ch. 78, the provisions of this act were extended to Richmond Co. The provisions of this act, so far as they relate to Westchester and Richmond Counties, were affected by L. 1787, ch. 95, § 3, relating to the laying out of roads through orchards; by 4 which prescribes the width of roads to be four rods, and by $ 7 relating to neglect of duties in relation to roads, by public officers. This act,

1781

1783

1784

Third session.

Statutes Not Specifically Repealed

Year

Ch.

Subject

1784

1784

1784

1784

1784

1784

so far as it related to Westchester Co., was consolidated
and revised in the Revised Acts, 1801, ch. 33, and in
so far as it affected Richmond Co. it was consolidated
and revised in the Revised Acts, 1801, ch. 111. The con-
structive repeal by L. 1801, ch. 193, which repeals all
acts and parts of acts coming within the purview or
operation of the Revised Acts, probably affected L. 1784,

ch. 52.
15 all...... Courts, oyer and terminer, N. Y. City and County.

Affects only the then present session. Temporary and

obsolete.
23 all...... Kings Co. court house and jail, repairs.

Temporary and obsolete.
28 all...... Gunpowder, keeping in N. Y. City and harbor.

Covered by charter, 1897, § 763. Obsolete.
38 all...... Tax for support of Episcopal clergy, N. Y. City, Queens,

Richmond and Westchester Counties.

This is a specific repeal of certain Colonial acts. 43 all...... Tax for municipal purposes, N. Y. City and County.

This act was for raising £6,000 for support of the poor; £4,000 for watchmen, lamps, wells and pumps. Tem

porary and obsolete. 49 all...... Westchester Co., silver mine, exemption of Richard Morris.

This act recites in the preamble that Morris “conceives he has discovered a mine which may be so charged with silver as to be subject to the payment of a proportion of it to the people of this state.” The act exempts said Morris, his heirs, etc., from the payment to the

state of any part of the produce of said mine. Obsolete. 56 all...... Fire of 1776, commissioners to adjust differences between

proprietors of lots in burnt district, and for altering the streets heretofore laid out adjoining said lots,

N. Y. City. The wording of the preamble of this act recites that a considerable part of the city having been destroyed by fires which have happened therein at different times during the late war

and the act authorizes the corporation of the city to appoint commissioners " for the purpose of laying out the streets in such parts of the said city

in such manner as shall appear to them most conducive to the convenience and ornament of the said city and to the advantage of the proprietors of those lots, the buildings of which have been destroyed by the said fires

The act prescribes the powers of the commissioners and directs the procedure.

The fire of 1776 (Sept. 21) began at Whitehall slip, burned up on the west side of Broadway as far as St. Paul's Church, and then, owing to a change of wind, burned to the edge of the North River, where the Washington market was afterwards located. Four hundred and ninety-three buildings were burned. The fire of 1778 (Aug. 7) started at Cruger's wharf and destroyed fifty houses. This act was amended, in respect to the assessment of damages for the laying out of Greenwich street, by L. 1786, ch. 50, and by L. 1787, ch. 75, which named a new commission.

1784

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