Explaining Chinese Democratization

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2000 - History - 194 pages

Hu seeks to explain China's failure to establish a democratic system. He demonstrates both continuity and change in China's democratization process. Modern China regards power and wealth as primary goals and treats a strong state as a major means to these ends. Such a preference puts democracy on a back burner.

Employing a theoretical framework which consists of five factors--historical legacies, local forces, the world system, socialist values, and economic development--Hu shows that, while all of these factors were at work in all eras, each assumes a special significance in a particular period. Traditional China before the 1911 Revolution attempted to adjust itself to a new, Western-dominated world. In the Republican era, the control of local forces topped the political agenda. Nationalist China sought to survive and develop in the world system, while Maoist China set for itself the task of building a socialist state. And, of course, economic development has been the priority of the Deng era. As Hu shows, these five factors have had determining impacts on the long struggle for democracy in China.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
DEMOCRACY AND ITS DESIRABILITY
4
EXISTING ANSWERS
7
AN ALTERNATIVE EXPLANATION
11
HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND DEMOCRACY
21
CONFUCIAN DOCTRINE
23
ALTERNATIVES TO CONFUCIANISM
27
AUTHORITARIAN TRADITIONS
31
CONCLUSION
88
SOCIALIST VALUES AND DEMOCRACY
97
SOCIALIST TRANSFORMATION
100
TWO TYPES OF ERROR
104
TOTALITARIAN RULE
109
CONCLUSION
113
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND DEMOCRACY
121
FAREWELL TO TOTALITARIANISM
122

CONCLUSION
35
LOCAL FORCES AND DEMOCRACY
43
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE REPUBLIC
44
THE TEMPTATION OF DICTATORSHIP
49
WARLORDISM
54
A LENINIST SOLUTION
57
CONCLUSION
63
THE WORLD SYSTEM AND DEMOCRACY
69
A WEAK STATE
73
THE JAPANESE INVASION
78
THE CIVIL WAR
84
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
125
POLITICAL REFORM
129
THE LEGITIMACY CRISIS
132
CONCLUSION
137
EXPLANATION AND PREDICTION
145
THE LACK OF DEMOCRATIC FORCES
148
THE LIMITATIONS OF DEMOCRACY
152
PROSPECTS FOR DEMOCRACY
154
BIBLIOGRAPHY
163
INDEX
189
Copyright

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Page 26 - If the people be led by laws, and uniformity sought to be given them by punishments, they will try to avoid the punishment, but have no sense of shame. "If they be led by virtue, and uniformity sought to be given them by the rules of propriety, they will have the sense of shame, and moreover will become good.
Page 1 - Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly encountered, given and transmitted from the past.
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Page 114 - Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude.
Page 18 - Daniel Lerner, The Passing of Traditional Society: Modernizing the Middle East (Glencoe: The Free Press, 1958). 7. Everett Hagen, "The Theory of Economic Development,
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Page 155 - Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.

About the author (2000)

SHAOHUA HU is Associate Professor at Wagner College, where he chairs the Department of Government and Politics and coordinates the International Affairs Program. A former fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, he is writing a book that compares major powers' policies toward cross-Taiwan Strait relations.

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