The life of ... Charles James Fox: ... his political career and a delineation of his character as a statesman, senator, and man of fashion ....

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E. Duyckinck, 1811 - 104 pages
 

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Page 81 - He said to me, that, as he heard it read, he felt an inward force upon him, which did so enlighten his mind and convince him, that he could resist it no longer ; for the words had an authority which did shoot like rays or beams in his mind; so that he was not only convinced by the reasonings he had about it, which satisfied his understanding, but by a power which did so eifectually constrain him, that he did ever after as firmly believe in his Saviour as if he had seen him in the clouds.
Page 29 - To this he answered, a man could not write with life unless he were heated by revenge ; for to write a satire without resentments, upon the cold notions of philosophy, was as if a man would, in cold blood, cut men's throats who had never offended him ; and he said the lies in these libels came often in as ornaments, that could not be spared without spoiling the beauty of the poem.
Page 91 - He seemed to feel, and even to envy, the happiness of my situation ; while I admired the powers of a superior man, as they are blended in his attractive character with the softness and simplicity of a child. Perhaps no human being was ever more perfectly exempt from the taint of malevolence, vanity, or falsehood.
Page 23 - Yet he laid out his wit very freely in libels and satires, in which he had a peculiar talent of mixing his wit with his malice, and fitting both with such apt words, that men were tempted to be pleased with them. From thence his composures came to be easily...
Page 20 - ... them. Boileau among the French, and Cowley among the English wits, were those he admired most. Sometimes other men's thoughts mixed with his composures, but that flowed rather from the impressions they made on him when he read them, by which they came to return upon him as his own thoughts, than that he servilely copied from any : for few men ever had a bolder flight of fancy, more steadily governed by judgment, than he had.
Page 78 - ... a true Repentance and Amendment of life for the time to come: or else, if the Lord pleaseth to put an end to my worldly being now, that He would mercifully accept of my Death-Bed Repentance, and perform that Promise that He hath been pleased to make, That at what time soever a Sinner doth Repent, He would receive him. Put up these Prayers, most dear Doctor, to Almighty God, for Your most Obedient and Languishing servant, ROCHESTER He told me, when.
Page 87 - Answer was, Oh that Language of Fiends which was so familiar to me, hangs yet about me: Sure none has deserved more to be damned than I have done.
Page v - Vindication of the Authority, Constitution, and Laws, of the Church and State of Scotland...
Page 91 - I did not take notes of our discourses last winter after we parted ; so I may perhaps in the setting out of my answers to him, have enlarged on several things both more fully and more regularly, than I could say them in such free discourses as we had. I am not so sure of all I set down as said by me, as I am of all said by him to me. But yet the substance of the greatest part, even of that, is the same.
Page 35 - ... managed and tamed by the wisdom, and for the use of man ? So that it is no real absurdity to grant, that appetites were put into men on purpose to exercise their reason in the restraint and government of them, which to be able to do ministers a higher and more lasting pleasure to a man than to give them their full scope and range.

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