The Life of Charles James Mathews: Chiefly Autobiographical, with Selections from His Correspondence and Speeches, Volume 2

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Macmillan and Company, 1879 - Actors - 660 pages
 

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Page 295 - ... the intercourse between the author and his fellowmen is ever new, active and immediate. He has lived for them more than for himself; he has sacrificed surrounding enjoyments, and shut himself up from the delights of social life, that he might the more intimately commune with distant minds and distant ages.
Page 295 - ... is ever new, active, and immediate. He has lived for them more than for himself; he has sacrificed surrounding enjoyments, and shut himself up from the delights of social life, that he might the more intimately commune with distant minds and distant ages. Well may the world cherish his renown; for it has been purchased, not by deeds of violence and blood, but by the diligent dispensation of pleasure.
Page 54 - If the enemy had received the least intimation from spy or deserter, or even suspected the scheme ; had the embarkation been disordered in consequence of the darkness of the night, the rapidity of the river, or the shelving nature of the north shore, near which they were obliged to row; had one sentinel been alarmed, or the...
Page 74 - There was introduced for the first time in England that reform in all theatrical matters which has since been adopted in every theatre in the kingdom. Drawing-rooms were fitted up like drawing-rooms, and furnished with care and taste. Two chairs no longer indicated that two persons were to be seated, the two chairs being removed indicating that the two persons were not to be seated.
Page 295 - I have always observed that the visitors to the abbey remained longest about them. A kinder and fonder feeling takes place of that cold curiosity or vague admiration with which they gaze on the splendid monuments of the great and the heroic. They linger about these as about the tombs of friends and companions ; for indeed there is something of companionship between the author and the reader.
Page 74 - The lighter phase of comedy, representing the more natural and less laboured school of modern life, and holding the mirror up to nature without regard to the conventionalities of the theatre, was the aim I had in view.
Page 274 - He wanted weight", as an old playgoer once reproachfully said of him; but he had the qualities of his defects, and the want of weight became delightful airiness. Whether he danced the...
Page 228 - Clatter' as much as a few years ago they would have enjoyed the roasting of a missionary or the baking of a baby? "It was certainly a page in one's life never to be forgotten.
Page 171 - ... the uproar ; but here was a long, dull, dismal, dreary display of malignity, which was effective from the mere fact that it was wearisome. One could not have conceived so much noise mixed up with a display of so soporific a character. The poor Frenchmen did all they could to conciliate this amiable specimen of the British public. They opened by playing " God save the Queen ; " and when, two or three times afterwards, the rioters, who were loyal to a fault, on this occasion demanded a repetition...
Page 74 - The theatre for my debut as an actor was chosen without a moment's hesitation. I had no passion for what was called the "regular drama." I had no respect for traditional acting, and had no notion of taking a " line of business," as it is called — that is, undertaking for so much per week all the characters in comedy and tragedy, whether fitting or not, played by Mr. Charles Kemble, or Mr. Jones, or Mr. Elliston, whose every movement was registered in the prompt-book, and from whose " business,"...

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