Romances of the Republic: Women, the Family, and Violence in the Literature of the Early American Nation

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Aug 29, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 208 pages
0 Reviews
Romances of the Republic contributes to the lively field of scholarship on the interconnection of ideology and history in early American literature. Shirley Samuels illustrates the relations of sexual, political, and familial rhetoric in American writing from 1790 to the 1850s. With special focus on depictions of the American Revolution and on the use of the family as a model and instrument of political forces, she examines how the historical novel formalizes the more extravagant features of the gothic novel--incest, murder, the horror of family--while incorporating a sentimental vision of the family. Samuels's analysis deals with writers like Charles Brockden Brown, Catherine Sedgwick, James Fenimore Cooper, and Mason Weems, and argues that their novels formulated a family structure that, unlike earlier models, was neither patriarchal nor a revolt against patriarchy. In emphasizing sibling rivalry and inter-generational quarrels about marriage, the novel of this period attempted to unite disparate political, national, class, and even racial positions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Family the State and the Novel in the Early Republic
3
Arthur Mervyn
23
Alien and Infidel
44
Cooper and the Domestic Revolution
57
4 Monuments and Hearths
76
The Making of Americans
96
6 The Identity of Slavery
113
Notes
129
Bibliography
173
Index
191
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information