Reorganization of the Bureau of Indian Affairs: Hearing Before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Eighth Congress, First Session on Proposed Reorganization of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, May 21, 2003, Washington, DC.

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Page 50 - account" for "the daily and annual balance of all funds held in trust by the United States for the benefit of an Indian Tribe or an individual Indian which are deposited or invested pursuant to the Act of June 24, 1938.
Page 46 - OST would receive a $123 million increase - to $275 million - which is partially offset by a $63 million cut to the BIA Construction and an $8 million cut to Indian Water and Claims Settlements. Of BIA Construction accounts, Education Construction will lose $32 million — despite a terrible backlog of new school construction needs that everyone agrees must be addressed.
Page 46 - ... grant, we are embarked upon a program to improve service to the public and to ultimately blend together bus and rail operations in a manner best calculated to provide an effective and efficient mass transportation system. Before turning to General Graham for a more detailed presentation of our program, I would like to express our appreciation to this committee for its support in moving this great transit objective ahead. We believe that we are well along the road in meeting the charter imposed...
Page 49 - Second, fractionated interests in individual Indian allotted land continue to expand exponentially with each new generation. Today, there are approximately four million owner interests in the 10 million acres of individually owned trust lands.
Page 50 - NCAI believes that it is critical for Congress to substantively address the underlying issues of transparency and accountability in fixing the trust system. We would greatly encourage the Committee to take up trust reform legislation that would hold the DOI to the ordinary standards of a trustee, and we would be pleased to work with you in developing that legislation. Core Business...
Page 50 - ... with payments received. The accounting system most often begins with the receipt of a check that is assumed to be accurate and timely. Implementing an effective lease recording system that is integrated with the title and accounting systems is a primary need for the Indian trust system. Accounting — The DOI needs to develop accounting systems that will integrate and verify information from one function into another (from title to leasing to accounting). The DOI should also set out what oversight...
Page 48 - DOI's efforts to fulfill its trust responsibilities, diminish the ability to productively use and manage trust resources, and threaten the capacity of tribes to provide secure political and economic homelands for their members. If allowed to continue unabated, fractionation will eventually overwhelm systems for trust administration and exact enormous costs for both the Administration and tribal communities. Reduction of fractional interests will increase the likelihood of more productive economic...
Page 47 - ... consultation with the tribes and individuals whose accounts are at stake. We are extremely concerned that the lack of definition of the responsibilities and authorities of new OST offices will cause serious conflicts with the functions performed by the BIA Agency Superintendents and/or Indian tribes. The authority and role of the proposed Trust Officers need much more explanation. Moreover, we believe that the funding and staff needs to flow directly to the agency and regional levels — not...
Page 36 - Mr. Chairman and distinguished members of the committee thank you for the invitation to speak to you today on such a critical problem in Indian country.
Page 25 - I now offer it for the record. The CHAIRMAN. It will be included in the record. (The...

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