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METROPOLITAN FIRE INSURANCE = COMPANY =

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OF CHICAGO, ILL. Organized. Officered and Owned by residents of this city. It should, therefore, receive the encouragement of the Insuring Public of Chicago,

CASH CAPITAL $100,000.00
CASH SURPLUS

25,000.00
TOTAL ASSETS

125,000.00

OFFICERS
THOS. F. KEELEY, President.
FRANK E. WILLARD, Vice Presidente
WM. J. KERWIN, Treasurer.
GEORGE ESSIG, Secretary.

DIRECTORS
TH08. F. KEELEY, President of Keeley Brewing Company
M. J. NAGHTEN, Of John Naghten & Company
Z. P. Brosseau, of Brosseau & Company, Board of Trade
EDWARD CLUFF, Pres. Union Casualty & Surety Co., St. Louis
JAMES I NAGHTEN, of John Naghten & Company
FRANK E. WILLARD, Sec. and Treas. Of Willard Sons & Bell Co.
PETER FORTUNE. President of Fortune Bros. Brewing Company
M. W. KERWIN, Capitalist
EOGENE M. KEELEY, Sec.-Treas. Keeley Brewing Company

JOHN NAGHTEN & COMPANY

GENERAL MANAGERS 159 LA SALLE STREET

HOME INSURANCE CO

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THE GREATEST AMERICAN COMPANY

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WANTS TO INSURE

YOUR HOME

*

Che National Filter

EVERY HOME

SHOULD HAVE

PURE DRINKING WATER

Give the

CHILDREN

Plenty of

WATER

But give it to thom

PURE

The Cost of a Filter is Saved Many

Times in Doctor Bills.

MANUFACTURED IN
ALL SIZES FOR THE HOME

NATIONAL FILTER CO.
304 Fisher Building,

CHICAGO

GRITCHELL, MILLER, WHITNEY & BARBOUR

FIRE INSURANCE AGENTS

174 LA SALLE STREET,

CHICAGO

Tolophon. MAIN

GOING TO

WASHINGTON

TAKE THE

DUCAT & LYON, Agents

BIG FOUR AND C. & O. RYS.

201 LA SALLE STREET

" THE SCENIC ROUTE"

THROGH OLD VIRGINIA.
Get information and sleeping car reservations by writing
I.P. SPINNING, N. W. P.A.C. & O. RY.

238 Clark Street, CHICAGO.

Phone Central 1235

IT IS WISER AND LESS EXPENSIVE TO SAVE CHILDREN THAN TO PUNISH CRIMINALA

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PUBLISHED IN THE INTEREST OF

HOMELESS AND DEPENDENT CHILDREN

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.

10 CENTS SINGLE COPY.

BOARD OF REFERENCE.

ALABAMA. in Harriet H. Johnson, Birmingham, Bon. United Charity Socloty.

CALIFORNIA.
la T. J. Murukoy. San France,

Judge Juvonllo Court.
P. V. Todd, San Francisco,

Merchant's Association.
Yle Cathorino Folton, San Franc
Gon Boc, Anoclated Charitice

COLORADO.
Ion B. B. Lindsay. Donver,
Judg. Juvonilo Court.

CONNECTICUT. Chas. P. Kollore. Waterbury.

la Rtato Board Charities. Yn Francis Sheldon Bolton, Now Haven, Dditor Mother', Journal.

DELAWARE.
Yn Vary A. T. Clark. Wilmington,
Sapt Amanrintad Mharitler.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
Ohs. T Wollor, Washington.
On. Supt. Charity Society.

FLORIDA.
D. W. Comstock,
Supt. Florida Children's Home Society.

ILLINOIS. Io. R 8. Tuthill.

Judo Juvenilo Conrt of Chicago. Dr H H Hart. Mirako. Ni..

Sunt Mildren's Home and Ald Boodloty. 1 P Rarknell. Chicago. Tii..

Aunt Ruronn ni Charities.
Prof. C. R. Henderson. Chicago. Ill.

Prm Nat'l Children's Home Society.
Don G. W Murray. Springfield. Til..
Judo Juvenil. Court

INDIANA. 1. W Antler. Indianapolis,

Atat. Rond Charities
Bon, non w Atuhba. Indianapolis

Judge Jyvonllo Court.
Aleynnder Johnson,
Pro Indiana State Conference of Char-

Itter and corrections. Ft. Waynı. Chao & Grout Indianamollo.

en Bec Marity Organization Socoty. Hon J E Ploty, Terre Hauto.

Judge Juvenile Court.
O. R. Mohler. Fort Wavno.
Gon. Soc. Acocinted Charities,

IOWA.
Amor R. Park. Kookuk.

Gen Sec. Associated Charities. John Bardsley, Dog Moines. Oon gmc Ausncinted Charities.

KANSAS.
J. D. Faxon, Lawronco,

Soc. Associated Charities.
J. E. Howard, Wichita,
Pre. Associated Charita.

KENTUCKY.
Georgo L. Schon,
Supt. Children's Home Society of Kon-

tucky.
Wise Mary Bryson, Covington,
Gen. Soc. Associated Charita.

LOUISIANA.
DL Rodenberg. Now Orleans,

Charity Organization Society:
James J. McLoughlin, Now Orleans,
Society Provention Cruelty to Children.

MARYLAND.
Hon. Charles W. Heuisler, Baltimore,

Judgo Juvenilo Court.
Joffrey R. Brackot, Baltimoro,
Prosident National Conference Chart
ties and Correction.

MASSACHUSETTS.
Chas. W. Birtwell, Boston,

13 Charity Building.
Leontino Lincoln, Fall River,

Stato Board Charities.
Vin Z. D. Smith, Boston,
Gon. Soc. Associated Charita

MICHIGAN.
James F. HIII, Detroit,
Society for Provention of Crudt
Childron.

MISSOURI.
Hon. Robt. M. Foster, St. Loula,

Judge Juvenilo Court.
Hon. James L. Blair, St. Louis,

Missouri Trust Building.
W. H. McClain, St. Louis,

Supt. Providont Association.
Hon. James Gibson, Kansas City.
Judge Juvenile Court.

MINNESOTA.
Jamos F. Jackson, Minneapolla,

Gen. Mgr. Associated Charitia.
A. W. Gutridge, St. Paul,
Sec. Associated Charities.

NEBRASKA.
Floyd M. Smith, Omaha,

Sec, Associated Charities.
G. W. Clark, Omaha,
Supt. Child Saving Instituta.

NEW JERSEY.
Hugh F. Fox, Plainfield,

Pres. Board of Children's Guardiana
Mrs. E. E. Williamson, Elizabeth,

State Board of Children's Guardians.

NEW YORK.
Hon. Willard H. Olmsted, New York
Judge Juvonllo Court.
Hon. Julius M. Mayor, Now York
Judgo Juvenile Court
E. Fellows Jenkins, New York,

Chiet Probuom dor, Juroll on Thos. M. Mulry, New York,

Saint Vincent De Paul Society. Edward T. Devino, New York,

Gen. Sec. Charity Organization found Hon. Robt. J. Wilkin, Brooklyn

Judgo Juvenilo Court.
Hon. Thos. Murphy, Bufalo,

Judge Juvenile Court.
Frederick Almy, Buffalo,

Soc. Charity Organization Soolou.
Hon. Homor Folks, New York,
Commlusioner Public Charition

OHIO.
Hon. T. E. Callaghan, Ctoveland,

Judge Juvenilo Court.
Hon. Sam Jones,

Mayor City of Toledo.
Chas. A. Allen, Dayton,

Soc. Associatod Charitla.
C. M. Hubbard, Cincinnati,
Gen. Sec. Associated Charition

PENNSYLVANIA.
Hon. Judge Bergy, Philadelphia

Judgo Juvenilo Court.
Hon. Marshall Brown, Pittsburk.
Judgo Juvenile Court.

WASHINGTON.
H. Wirt Steele, Soattle,
Gon. Soc. Charity Organization Beton

WISCONSIN.
Hon. N. B. Neelen, Milwauko

Judge Juvenile Court.
G. Frellson, Milwaukee,
Agent Associated Charitiou.

RHODE ISLAND.
Miss M. K. Conyngton, Providenog
Soc. Socloty for Organizing Charto.

TENNESSEE.
Ul. M. F. Battlo, Nashville,

Sec. United Charities.
John Boring, Chattanooga,
Supt. Associated Charitia.

TEXAS.
Miss F. Saylor, Dallas.
Sec. Unitod Charities.

CANADA.
J. J. Kelso, Toronto,
Supt. Children's Aid Society

OBJECTS of THE JUVENILE COURT RECORD

The object of the JUVENILE COURT RECORD is to disseminate the principles of the Juvenile Court throughout the United States and, in fact, the entire world.

When the Juvenile Court was first established a little more than four years ago, the sociologists of the entire country stood by, watching anxiously the outcome of this new departure in child-saving methods. It was realized that a medium was needed whereby the results accomplished by the Juvenile Court might be set forth in an intelligent manner. The JUVENILE COURT RECORD stepped into the breach, and has devoted its pages exclusively to news of the various juvenile courts. As a result of the publicity thus given to the foundation principles and routine work of the Cook County Juvenile Court, fifteen other states have passed juvenile court laws, and bills are being prepared in nearly every state in the Union to be presented at the next session of the Legislatures of the various states, providing for similar legislation.

The foundation thought and idea of the juvenile court law is that children should be kept in the home to the greatest extent possible. The child's own home is preferred by the Court, but in lieu of that it is intended that any good home where proper care and training will be given, shall be provided for the child.

The State, in assuming its relationship as the guardian of the rights of the child, assumes a serious

responsibility. Every child has a right to education and physical care. Primarily, this duty lies with the parents. This obligation should be enforced wherever possible. The family is the unit of society, and most of the evils of society arise from demoralized homes. It is the duty of the State to co-operate with the family as long as possible, and help hold it up. If, however, for any reason the family tails, then a new home is necessary until such time as the family may again be brought tog?ther. If the family proves recreant and abdicates its functions altogether, it is the duty of the State to secure as nearly normal conditions for the children under its care and custody as may be in its power. The home is the normal place for a child's education and training. The Institution should be only a temporary station on the road from a ruined home to a permanent home with foster parents.

The fact that children are to be placed in homes presupposes the idea that some agency will be at hand to find a childless home for a homeless child. To the limit of its resources the JUVENILE COURT RECORD assists in finding homes for the homeless, helpless little waifs drifting about the country. These little unfortunates need an advocate, and the JUVENILE COURT RECORD acts in this capacity, standing side by side with them, pointing the way to a brighter, happier life, where the weeds of evil will bo choked out of existence and the flowers of hope will bloom in their place,

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Says LESLIE M. SHAW, Secretary of the Treasury. Secretary Shaw has a habit of saying things every little while seat in the house. If he is athletic, give him bats and balls, the that set his countrymen and country women thinking hard. The punching bag and boxing gloves, but encourage his athletic exercharacteristic is not a new one with him, nor has it developed cise in the house, the barn or the adjoining lots. If he discloses a since he went to live in Washington. When he was governor of ieaning toward any special science, art or craft, encourage it, and. Iowa he had a way of making public announcements that started so far as you can afford it, give him the appliances, books or debating societies going at full speed all over the country.

mechanism necessary for its development. But he has never made any statement of quite such general and vital interest as he did the other day in Washington when he

MAKE HOME ATTRACTIVE. spoke before a large number of women on the subject of "Boys." "But install them in your home and keep him home as mucii as The feature of this address that has caught the ear of a great possible. Has he a penchant for billiards ? Get him a table, even many fathers and mothers was the sentence:

if it be a miniature one. The more hours each day your son "There is no place for the boy,” followed up with this explanation:

spends at home the more and the sooner he develops a clean,

healthy social temperament. "I think that most of us who have been boys and those of us

"Encourage him to invite clean, manly boys of about his own who have watched the boy will have found and recognized that age to his home, and let him return such calls. Spend as much he is, all things considered, the most valuable thing on this earth. time with your sons at home as business will permit; enter into VALUE OF THE BOY.

their studies, their play, their thoughts, interests and ambitions. "The boy is worth more than any other creature that treads the Take them out with you as often as possible. Encourage an earth, yet far more than any other thing in the world, I think intimacy with them. Make them your companions as well as your there is less place for him. Now don't misunderstand me. He is sons, as far as practicable. less welcome anywhere than others; there are less kind words for

"From I 10 5 years old the boy differs little in domestic econohim than anybody else. I am not saying that the lad measures up

my from the girl. He is a cherub to be fondled and trundled and to the standard of the girl's life. I will grant you that we are

kissed. From 5 to 10 he becomes noisy, turbulent and destructive, raising a very much better type of young women than we are

with splendid appetite and vigorous digestion. The best treatyoung men. But we are none the less interested in the young

ment during this period is plain corduroy or never-rip clothes, men, none the less interested in the boy.

heavy shoes, spring-lock doors, easily opened from the inside, and “From morning to night it is 'stop it' and 'don't do this' and ever ready sandwiches and doughnuts. Never bar his egress 'don't do that' and 'don't come in here with your muddy feet.'

from the house; it's a waste of time. He won't go far-his appe“He never sees much of his father. The father is gone in the tite won't let him. The spring lock, however, gives you a chance morning and the boy is in bed when father comes home, and all to look aver his muddy boots before they strike the rugs or carhe sees are other boys and some most excellent and very compe pets. tent women teachers. But you can not rear a man without bring

THE FIRESIDE CONFERENCE. ing the boy in contact with man. That is what the family is for.

"Between 10 and 15 years your son needs special care and That this boy should be brought into the world and just left to

attentiori During this period he begins to show his natural bent the mother to rear is the darkest error. He must come in con

or inclination toward industry or idleness, manliness or effemitact with both his father and mother."

nacy, integrity or moral weakness. If he is strong and healthy, JUDGE DUNNE'S IDEAS.

keep him steadily at school. Give him plenty of time for physical Judge Edward F. Dunne, when asked “What is the boy's place exercise in the daylight, but see that he is at home after dinner. in the home?” said:

Between dinner and bedtime the boy of this age, if he is a “To me the answer seems simple. Any place at home is the healthy minded lad, can employ himself at home most profitably boy's place, so long as he is at home. Give him any place in the and enjoyably. His mental labor at school has been relieved by establishment congenial to his tastes, but see that he remains at the physical labor of after school sports and games. He has home as much as possible. If he studies, give him the softest digested his dinner, and physical relaxation is both healthful and

pleasing. An hour over his lessons for the succeeding day leaves him another hour before he need go to bed.

"This hour should be regarded by both parents and children as sacred and devoted to the family altar. Mother, father, daughter

and son should for that hour become comrades. A boy of 15 who spends from dinner to the hour for sleep among his own people in this way will never go wrong.

"From 15 to 20 comes the first breaking of the family ties, when

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the answer to this question, "Where is the boy's place at home?' is most frequently answered by the boy. If his parents are of poor or moderate means he goes to work. If they have ample means he goes to college or the university—and sometimes to the devil. If, however, he be a boy of manly instinct and honest heart, wherever his province may be, his place at home' is always, in spirit at least, at the side of his mother and sisters.

"Be he in the workshop, the factory, the mill, the college or the university, his place is in his mother's heart and at the family fireside. If in the years he has passed before leaving home he has been made his father's friend and companion, he still remains that friend and companion in spirit, and will on meeting him do as two boys I know-one of 16 and the other of 13-kiss that father and murmur in their slumber, "There's no place like home.'”

Professor Graham Taylor of Chicago Commons,

WHATS THE USE 299

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