Peter Parley's magazine

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Page 196 - The poetry of earth is never dead: When all the birds are faint with the hot Sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead. That is the grasshopper's : he takes the lead In summer luxury — he has never done With his delights, for when tired out with fun, He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed.
Page 255 - If that be the case," said the father, "you certainly shall not go; but make another attempt, and I will leave it to your honour. If the road is dangerous, you may return: but remember, boys, I leave it to your honour." The snow was deep enough to have afforded them a reasonable excuse; but Horatio was not to be prevailed upon to turn back. "We must go on," said he: "remember, brother, it was left to our honour!
Page 115 - ... neither would he compare the friendship between him and them to a chain, for the rain might sometimes rust it, or a tree might fall and break it; but he should consider them as the same flesh and blood with the christians, and the same as if one man's body were to be divided into two parts.
Page 200 - He was singular for his desire to be buried in the open churchyard, and not in the chancel of the minster, as was usual with other bishops...
Page 13 - Then came old January, wrapped well In many weeds to keep the cold away; Yet did he quake and quiver, like to quell, And blowe his nayles to warme them if he may; For they were numbd with holding all the day An hatchet keene, with which he felled wood And from the trees did lop the needlesse spray: Upon an huge great Earth-pot steane he stood, From whose wide mouth there flowed forth the Romane Flood.
Page 115 - ... rain might sometimes rust it, or a tree might fall and break it; but he should consider them as the same flesh and blood with the Christians, and the same, as if one man's body were to be divided into two parts. He then took up the parchment, and presented it to the Sachem, who wore the horn in the...
Page 115 - If any disputes should arise between the two, they should be settled by twelve persons, half of whom should be English, and half Indians. He then paid them for the land, and made them many presents besides from the merchandise which had been spread before them.
Page 115 - He then paid them for the land, and made them many presents besides from the merchandise which had been spread before them. Having done this he laid the roll of parchment on the ground, observing again that the ground should be common to both people. He then added that he would not do as the Marylanders did, that is, call them children or brothers only; for often parents were apt to whip their children too severely...
Page 114 - They were then met on the broad pathway of good faith and good will, so that no advantage was to be taken on either side, but all was to be openness, brotherhood, and love.
Page 112 - Sachems, were spread upon the ground. He held a roll of parchment, containing the confirmation of the treaty of purchase and amity, in his hand. One of the...

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