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will always draw Ships into its Ports, which there finding at a reasonable price and in good Order, all that the other most distant Provinces can have, will hardly go so far, whilst any thing is to be had in Carolina.

4thly, and lastly, And what is. of the greatest Importance of all is, that there is an entire Liberty of Conscience and Commerce for all that come thither, without paying any thing for it; Justice is duly administred to all; and every body can say that what he possesses lawfully belongs to him in full Propriety. There are no Tenths, Imposts, Tailles, nor Capitation Taxes, nor any of those Burdens which render so many other People unhappy : In a word, you have all the Laws, Liberties, and Priveleges there which are enjoyed in England: Tis the Lower House that has the Disposal of the Money of the Province, and who vote the Taxes necessary for the publick Service, however with the Approbation of the Upper House, and that of his Majesty, represented by the Governor; and when one of the two Houses would have an Act passed, on any Subject whatsoever, after having examined and debated all the Clauses thereof, it is ingrossed and sent to the other House for their Concurrence. But this Act, or rather projected Act, has at that time only the Name of a Bill, that is to say, properly, an Act proposed. Now if this Bill is passed by the other House, it is carried to the Governor, who may either approve or reject it; and 'tis not till the Moment the Governor gives his Consent thereto, that it takes the Form of a Law, and has all the Force thereof; for if either of the Houses or Governor rejects the said Bill, it drops of course. Therefore nothing better proves, that the Constitution of the Government of Carolina, as well as that of England, is founded on the Union between the King and the People, since they make only one and the same Body, of which his Majesty is always the Head; from whence it may be concluded and boldly affirmed that the English are the most free and happy People at this Time in the whole World. We whose Names are hereunto subscrib'd, do Attest, that all

which is contain'd in this Account of South Carolina, is the real Truth, having been Eye-Witnesses of most part of the Particulars therein mentioned. Done at Charles Town the 23d of September, 1731. '

John PETER PURRY, of Neufchatel.
JAMES RICHARD, of Geneva.
ABRAHAM MEURON, of St Sulpy in the

County of Neufchatel.
HENRY RAYMOND, of St Sulpy.

ELE

Proposals by Mr. Peter PURRY, of Newfchatel, for Encours

agement of such Swiss Protestants as should agree to accome pany him to Carolina, to settle a New Colony.

There are only two Methods, viz: one for Persons to go as Servants, the other to settle on their own Account.

1. Those who are desirous to go as Servants must be Carpenters, Vine-planters, Husbandmen, or good Labourers.

2. They must be such as are not very Poor, but in a Condition to carry with them what is sufficient to support their common Necessity.

3. They must have at least 3 or 4 good Shirts, and a Suit of Cloathes each.

4. They are to have each for their Wages 100 Livres yearly, which make 50 Crowns of the Money of Newfchatel in Swisserland, but their Wages are not to commence till the Day of their arrival in Carolina.

5. Expert Carpenters shall have suitable Encouragement.

6. The time of their Contract shall be 3 Years, reckoning from the Day of their arrival in that Country.

7. They shall be supply'd in part of their Wages with Money to come from Swisserland, till they imbark for Carolina.

8. Their Wages shall be paid them regularly at the end of every Year; for security whereof, they shall have the Fruits of their Labour, and generally all that can be procured for them, whether Moveables or Imoveables.

9. Victuals and Lodging from the Day of their Imbarkation shall not be put to their account, nor their Passage by Sea.

10. They shall have what Money they want advanced during the Term of their Service in part of their Wages to buy Linnen, Clothes, and all other Necessaries.

11. If they happen to fall Sick they shall be lodg’d and nourish'd Gratis, but their Wages shall not go on during their Illness, or that they are not able to Work.

12. They shall serve after Recovery, the time they had lost during their Sickness.

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13. What goes to pay Physicians or Surgeons, shall be put to their Accompt.

As to those who go to settle on their own Account, they must have at least 50 Crowns each, because their Passage by Sea, and Victuals, will cost from 20 to 25 Crowns, and the rest of the Money shall go to procure divers things which will be absolutely necessary for the Voyage.

It may not be disagreable in this place to inform our Readers, that Mr. Purry, on his Return to Swisserland, with this Account of CAROLINA, soon prevail'd on many industrious Persons and their Families to the Number of about 400, to go with him. On the 11th of this Month (August, 1732,] they embarked at Calais in France, on Board two English Ships, which arrived off Dover the next Day, and are now sailed on their Voyage. Mr. Bignion their Minister came to London, and received Episcopal Ordination: So that the Reflections which some have cast on the Religion of these people, are unjustly founded.

DESCRIPTION OF GEORGIA,

BY A GENTLEMAN WHO HAS RESIDED THERE

UPWARDS OF SEVEN YEARS,

AND WAS

ONE OF THE FIRST SETTLERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR C. CORBET, BOOKSELLER AND PUBLISHER, AT ADDISON'S

HEAD, AGAINST ST. DUNSTAN'S CHURCH, IN FLEET STREET.

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