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" Lambert, the king would not take his life, both out of magnanimity, taking him but as an image of wax, that others had tempered and molded ; and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he suffered death, he would be forgotten too soon ; but being kept... "
The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England - Page 192
by Francis Bacon - 1825
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Writings historical. Letters

Francis Bacon - Philosophy - 1819
...the field, was of the enemies part four thousand at the least; and of the King's part, one half of his vant-guard, besides many hurt, but none of name....continual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the like inchantments of people in time to come. For which cause he was taken into service in his court to a...
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The works of Francis Bacon, Volume 5

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1819
...the field, was of the enemies part four thousand at the least; and of the King's part, one half of his vant-guard, besides many hurt, but none of name....continual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the like inchantments of people in time to come. For which cause he was taken into service in his court to a...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans ..., Volume 5

Francis Bacon - English literature - 1824
...life, both out of magnanimity, taking him but as an image of wax, that others had tempered and moulded; and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he suffered...kitchen; so that, in a kind of mattacina of human fortune, he turned a broach, that had worn a crown; whereas fortune commonly doth not bring in a comedy...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban, and Lord ...

Francis Bacon - 1826
...kept alive, he would be a continual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the \ like inchantments of people in time to come. For which cause he was...kitchen ; so that, in a kind of mattacina of human fortune, he turned a broach, that had worn a crown ; whereas fortune commonly doth not bring in a comedy...
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The Pictorial History of England: Being a History of the People, as Well as ...

George Lillie Craik - Great Britain - 1839
...wax, that others had tempered and moulded — and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he Buffered death, he would be forgotten too soon, but being kept...his court, to a base office in his kitchen ; so that he turned a broachf that had worn a crown And afterwards he was preferred to be one of the king's falconers....
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science ..., Volume 12

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington) - 1839
...kitchen or a parlour for his own use ? Hooker. Laura to his lady was but a kitcheiwench. Sliakspeare. He was taken into service in his court to a base office in his kitchen ; so that he turned a broach that had worn a crown. /f ь , . Gardens, if planted with such things as aie fit...
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The Pictorial History of England: Being, a History of the People ..., Volume 3

George Lillie Craik - Great Britain - 1841
...diit of magnanimity — taking him but as an image of wax, that others had tempered and moulded — and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he suffered death, he would be forgotten too soon, but beinir kept alive he would be a continual spectacle, ami a kind of remedy against the like enchantments...
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The Cabinet History of England: Being an Abridgment, by the ..., Volumes 5-6

Charles MacFarlane - Great Britain - 1845
...out of magnanimity — taking him but as an image of wax, that others had tempered and moulded — and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he suffered...court, to a base office in his kitchen ; so' that he turned a broachf that had worn a crown And afterwards he was preferred to be one of the king's falconers....
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The Cabinet Portrait Gallery of British Worthies...

1845
...being kept alive, he would be a perpetual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the like enchantment of people in time to come. For which cause he was...office in his kitchen ; so that, in a kind of mattacina [pantomime] of human fortune, he turned a broach that had worn a crown ; whereas fortune commonly does...
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The Cabinet Portrait Gallery of British Worthies..

Authors - 1845
...; both out of magnanimity, taking him but as an image of wax that others had tempered and moulded ; and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that, if he suffered...forgotten too soon, but, being kept alive, he would be a perpetual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the like enchantment of people in time to come. For...
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