Plain Educational Talks with Teachers and Parents: By Albert N. Raub ...

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Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger, 1869 - Education - 220 pages

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Page 13 - So by the hourly change of his principles, the father conceals their untenableness and onesidedness. As for his wife, she is neither like him, nor yet like that harlequin who came on to the stage with a bundle of papers under each arm, and answered to the inquiry, what he had under his right arm, "orders," and to what he had under his left arm, "counter-orders.
Page 12 - ... for a moral education, they would run somewhat after this fashion: — In the first hour ' pure morality must be read to the child, either by myself or the tutor ;' in the second, 'mixed morality, or that which may be applied to one's own advantage ; ' in the third, ' do you not see that your father does so and so...
Page 122 - There is such a rush of all other kinds of words in our days, that it seems desirable to give kind words a chance among them. There are vain words, and idle words, and hasty words, and spiteful words, and silly words, and empty words, and profane words, and boisterous words, and warlike words. Kind words also produce their own image on men's souls. And a beautiful image it is. They smooth, and quiet, and comfort the hearer.
Page 122 - Kind words make other people goodnatured. Cold words freeze people, and hot words scorch them, and bitter words make them bitter, and wrathful words make them wrathful.
Page 122 - They shame him out of his sour, morose, unkind feelings. We have not yet begun to use kind words in such abundance as they ought to be used.
Page 182 - In a school, or hospital, or other considerable assemblage of people, the purity of the air may be pretty accurately measured by the amount of cheerfulness, activity, and lively interest, which pervades it ; and yet so little do people think or care about this subject, that, under existing arrangements, there are very few who do not every day of their lives inspire more or less highlyvitiated air.
Page 12 - ... the world and become something in the state " : in the sixth, " not the temporary but the eternal determines the worth of a man ": in the seventh, " therefore rather suffer injustice and be kind " : in the eighth, •' but defend yourself bravely if any one attack you ": in the ninth, " do not make such a noise, dear child ": in the tenth, " a boy must not sit so quiet ": in the eleventh, " you nvust obey your parents better": in the twelfth, "and educate yourself.
Page 121 - The village master taught his little school. A man severe he was, and stern to view, I knew him well, and every truant knew: Well had the boding tremblers learned to trace The day's disasters in his morning face...
Page 183 - The h'stlessness and stupidity of students, and especially of children confined in the echoolroom, are often due to the bad state of the air they breathe. Using the brain in a vitiated atmosphere is like working with a blunted instrument, and the effect, of course, must be aggravated when the inexperienced are first learning the use of the instrument.
Page 12 - pure morality most be read to the child, either by myself or the tutor ; ' in the second, ' mixed morality, or that which may be applied to one's own advantage ; ' in the third, ' do you not see that your father does so and so ? ' in the fourth, ' you are little, and this is only fit for grown-up people ; ' in the fifth, ' the chief matter is that you should succeed in the world, and become something in the state...

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