The Oscotian, or literary gazette of St. Mary's

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Page 124 - Oh, ever thus, from childhood's hour, I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; I never loved a tree or flower But 'twas the first to fade away ; I never nursed a dear gazelle, To glad me with its soft black eye, But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die.
Page 143 - Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, 'Tis woman's whole existence; man may range The court, camp, church, the vessel, and the mart, Sword, gown, gain, glory, offer in exchange Pride, fame, ambition, to fill up his heart, And few there are whom these cannot estrange: Men have all these resources, we but one, To love again, and be again undone.
Page 124 - twas the first to fade away. I never nursed a dear gazelle. To glad me with its soft black eye, But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die ! Now too — the joy most like divine Of all I ever dreamt or knew. To see thee, hear thee, call thee mine, — Oh, misery! must I lose that too? Yet go — on peril's brink we meet ; — Those frightful rocks — that treacherous sea — No, never come again — though sweet, Though heaven, it may be death to thee.
Page 395 - Once more upon the waters ! yet once more ! And the waves bound beneath me as a steed That knows his rider.
Page 30 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
Page 98 - The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always list'ning to himself appears. All books he reads, and all he reads assails, From Dryden's Fables down to Durfey's Tales.
Page 190 - Some are bewilder'd in the maze of schools, And some made coxcombs Nature meant but fools. In search of wit these lose their common sense, And then turn critics in their own defence : Each burns alike, who can, or cannot write, Or with a rival's or an eunuch's spite.
Page 328 - My task is done — my song hath ceased — my theme Has died into an echo ; it is fit The spell should break of this protracted dream. The torch shall be extinguished which hath lit My midnight lamp — and what is writ, is writ ; — Would it were worthier...
Page 56 - Hope smiles, joy springs, and though cold caution pause And weave delay, the better hour is near That shall remunerate thy toils severe By peace for Afric, fenced with British laws. Enjoy what thou hast won, esteem and love From all the just on earth, and all the blest above.
Page 233 - Come hither, come hither — by night and by day, We linger in pleasures that never are gone ; Like the waves of the summer, as one dies away, Another as sweet and as shining comes on. And the love that is o'er, in expiring gives birth To a new one as warm, as unequall'd in bliss ; And oh ! if there be an elysium on earth, It is this, it is this.

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