A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations, Volume 20

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1816 - Trials
 

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Page 81 - The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only [by] positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself, from whence it was created, is erased from memory: it's so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it, but positive law.
Page 251 - ... you, or by such further powers, instructions and authorities, as shall at any time hereafter be granted or appointed you, under our signet, and sign manual, or by our order in our privy council...
Page 801 - ... you heard it in the complaints of your people. It is not however too late to correct the error of your education. We are still inclined to make an indulgent allowance for the pernicious lessons you received in your youth, and to form the most sanguine hopes from the natural benevolence of your disposition.'' We are far from thinking you capable of a direct deliberate purpose to invade those original rights of your subjects, on which all their civil and political liberties depend. Had it been...
Page 657 - In contempt of our said Lord the King, in open violation of the laws of this kingdom, to the evil and pernicious example of all others in the like case offending, and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his crown and dignity.
Page 805 - There is a moment of difficulty and danger at which flattery and falsehood can no longer deceive, and simplicity itself can no longer be misled. Let us suppose it arrived. Let us suppose a gracious wellintentioned prince, made sensible at last of the great duty he owes to his people, and of his own disgraceful situation; that he looks round him for assistance, and asks for no advice, but how to gratify the wishes and secure the happiness of his subjects.
Page 247 - Britain by which the said governments are constituted, given express power and direction to our governors of our said colonies respectively, that so soon as the state and circumstances of the said colonies will admit thereof, they shall with the advice and consent of the members of our council, summon and call general assemblies...
Page 797 - WHEN the complaints of a brave and powerful people are observed to increase in proportion to the wrongs they have suffered; when, instead of sinking into submission, they are roused to resistance, the time will soon arrive at which every inferior consideration must yield to the security of the sovereign, and to the general safety of the state.
Page 541 - It would be unjust to bind any person who could not be admitted to make a defense, or to examine witnesses, or to appeal from a judgment he might think erroneous ; and therefore the depositions of witnesses in another cause in proof of a fact, the verdict of a jury finding the fact, and the judgment of the court upon facts found, although evidence against the parties, and all claiming under them, are not, in general, to be used to the prejudice of strangers.
Page 875 - The Praetorian bands, enervated and debauched as they were, had still strength enough to awe the Roman populace : but when the distant legions took the alarm, they marched to Rome, and gave away the empire.
Page 797 - It is the misfortune of your life, and originally the cause of every reproach and distress which has attended your government, that you should never have been acquainted with the language of truth, until you heard it in the complaints of your people. It is not, however, too late to correct the error of your education. We are still inclined to make an indulgent allowance for the pernicious lessons you received in your youth, and to form the most sanguine hopes from the natural benevolence of your...

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