Historiography and Self-Definition: Josephos, Luke-Acts, and Apologetic Historiography

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BRILL, 1992 - Religion - 500 pages
For centuries scholars have recognized the apologetic character of the Hellenistic Jewish historians, Josephos, and Luke-Acts; they have not, however, adequately addressed their possible relationships to each other and to their wider cultures. In this first full systematic effort to set these authors within the framework of Greco-Roman traditions, Professor Sterling has used genre criticism as a method for locating a distinct tradition of historical writing, apologetic historiography. Apologetic historiography is the story of a subgroup of people which deliberately Hellenizes the traditions of the group in an effort to provide a self-definition within the context of the larger world. It arose as a result of a dialectic relationship with Greek ethnography. This work traces the evolution of this tradition through three major eras of eastern Mediterranean history spanning six hundred years: the Persian, the Greek, and the Roman.
 

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Contents

Greek Ethnography
18
Ethnography in Transition
55
The Origins of Apologetic Historiography
103
Manethon
117
The Hellenistic Jewish Historians
137
The Hellenistic Jewish Historians
196
Eupolemos
207
The Antiquitates Judaicae of Josephos
226
LukeActs
311
Bibliography
394
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Gregory E. Sterling, Ph.D. (1990) in New Testament, Graduate Theological Union, is Assistant Professor of New Testament, University of Notre Dame. His publications include various articles on apologetic historiography.