Mother's Milk: Breastfeeding Controversies in American Culture

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Family & Relationships - 274 pages
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Mother's Milk examines why nursing a baby is an ideologically charged experience in contemporary culture. Drawing upon medical studies, feminist scholarship, anthropological literature, and an intimate knowledge of breastfeeding itself, Bernice Hausman demonstrates what is at stake in mothers' infant feeding choices--economically, socially, and in terms of women's rights. Breastfeeding controversies, she argues, reveal social tensions around the meaning of women's bodies, the authority of science, and the value of maternity in American culture. A provocative and multi-faceted work, Mother's Milk will be of interest to anyone concerned with the politics of women's embodiment.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Dead Babies
33
Rational Management
69
Breast Is Best
91
Stone Age Mothering
121
Womanly Arts
155
Breastfeeding Feminism Activism
189
Lactation and Sexual Difference
229
Works Cited
257
Index
267
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About the author (2003)

Bernice L. Hausman is Professor of English at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, where she also teaches for the Women's Studies Program. She is the author of Changing Sex: Transsexualism, Technology, and the Idea of Gender and writes about medicine, gender theory, and the body. She lives in Blacksburg, VA.

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