Gleason's Monthly Companion, Volume 9

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F. Gleason, 1880

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Page 463 - Where did you get your eyes so blue? Out of the sky as I came through. What makes the light in them sparkle and spin? Some of the starry spikes left in. Where did you get that little tear? I found it waiting when I got here.
Page 463 - WHERE did you come from, baby dear ? Out of the everywhere into here. Where did you get your eyes so blue ? Out of the sky as I came through.
Page 350 - In general, every evil to which we do not succumb is a benefactor. As the Sandwich Islander believes that the strength and valor of the enemy he kills passes into himself, so we gain the strength of the temptation we resist.
Page 292 - Over and over again. Over and over again The brook through the meadow flows, And over and over again The ponderous mill-wheel goes. Once doing will not suffice, Though doing be not in vain, And a blessing, failing us once or twice, May come if we try again.
Page 463 - Where did you get those arms and hands? Love made itself into hooks and bands. Feet, whence did you come, you darling things? From the same box as the cherubs' wings. How did they all just come to be you? God thought about me, and so I grew.
Page 95 - But he never would believe that Providence had sent a few men into the world ready booted and spurred to ride, and millions ready saddled and bridled to be ridden.
Page 142 - OF TIME'S CONTINUAL -SPEED. IN all the actions which a man performs, some part of his life passes. We die while doing that, for which alone, our sliding life was granted. Nay, though we do nothing, time keeps his constant pace, and flies as fast in idleness as in employment. Whether we play or labour^ or sleep or dance or study, the sun posts on, and the sand runs.
Page 23 - Suppose the glistening dew-drop Upon the grass should say, " What can a little dew-drop do ? I'd better roll away" — The blade on which it rested, Before the day was done, Without a drop to moisten it, Would wither in the sun.
Page 111 - Never are kind acts done To wipe the weeping eyes, But like flashes of the sun, They signal to the skies ; And up above the angels read How we have helped the sorer need.
Page 430 - ... comparison: her society is the emblem of sublimer enjoyments; her person is angelic, and her conversation heavenly; she is all softness and sweetness, peace, love, wit, and delight; she is every way suitable to the sublimest wish; and...

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