Essays [tr. by Cotton

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Hurd and Houghton, 1866

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Page 343 - Felix, qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas; Atque metus omnes et inexorabile fatum Subjecit pedibus, strepitumque Acherontis avari!
Page 302 - Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise. 19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness. 20 And again. The Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, that they are vain.
Page 153 - Nam tu sola potes tranquilla pace iuvare mortalis, quoniam belli fera moenera Mavors armipotens regit, in gremium qui saepe tuum se reicit aeterno devictus vulnere amoris, atque ita suspiciens tereti cervice reposta pascit amore avidos inhians in te, dea, visus, eque tuo pendet resupini spiritus ore.
Page 155 - There is stuff enough in our language, but there is a defect in cutting out: for there is nothing that might not be made out of our terms of hunting and war, which is a fruitful soil to borrow from; and forms of speaking, like herbs, improve and grow stronger by being transplanted.
Page 156 - I can hardly be without Plutarch; he is so universal, and so full, that upon all occasions, and what extravagant subject soever you take in hand, he will still be at your elbow and hold out to you a liberal and not to be exhausted hand of riches and embellishments. It vexes me that he is so exposed to be the spoil of those who are conversant with him: I can scarce cast an eye upon him but I purloin either a leg or a wing.
Page 157 - but I correct the faults of inadvertence, not those of custom. Do I not talk at the same rate throughout? Do I not represent myself to the life? Tis enough that I have done what I designed; all the world knows me in my book, and my book in me.
Page 95 - Tis there that I am in my kingdom, and there I endeavour to make myself an absolute monarch, and to sequester this one corner from all society, conjugal, filial, and civil; elsewhere I have but verbal authority only, and of a confused essence.
Page 484 - Nouvelle édition exactement purgée des défauts des précédentes, selon le vray original : Et enrichie et augmentée aux marges du nom des Autheurs qui y sont citez et de la Version de leurs Passages ; Avec des observations très-importantes et nécessaires pour le soulagement du Lecteur.
Page 216 - I most esteem in myself, derive more honour from decrying, than for commending myself : which is the reason why I so often fall into, and so much insist upon that strain. But, when all is summed up, a man never speaks of himself without loss ; a man's accusations of himself are always believed ; his praises never.
Page 45 - Vices there help to make up the seam in our piecing, as poisons are useful for the conservation of health. If they become excusable because they are of use to us, and that the common necessity covers their true qualities, we are to resign this part to the strongest and boldest citizens, who sacrifice their honour and conscience, as others of old sacrificed their lives, for the good of their country: we, who are weaker, take upon us parts both that are more easy and less hazardous.

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