An Account of the Polynesian Race: Comparative vocabulary of the Polynesian and Indo-European languages. With a preface by Prof. W. D. Alexander. 1885

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 20 - And yet there is not an English jury now-a-days which, after examining the hoary documents of language, would reject the claim of a common descent and a legitimate relationship between Hindu, Greek, and Teuton.
Page 20 - same blood was running in his veins as in the veins of the dark Bengalee. And yet there is not an English jury now-a-days which, after examining the hoary documents of language, would reject the claim of a common descent and a legitimate relationship between Hindu, Greek, and Teuton.
Page 44 - The root as no doubt means to be, but it has that meaning because it originally meant to breathe. From it, in its original sense of breathing, the Hindus formed asu, breath, and Asura, the name of God, whether it meant the breathing one or the giver of breath.
Page 19 - No authority could have been strong enough to persuade the Grecian army that their gods and their hero-ancestors were the same as those of King Porus, or to convince the English soldier that the
Page 17 - It is in the sentence, not in the isolated word, that languages agree or differ, and grammar deals with the relations that the several parts of the sentence bear to one another. Single words may accidentally resemble each other in both sound and sense, and yet belong to languages which have nothing in common.
Page 9 - The genealogical classification of languages, that which divides them into families and subfamilies, each mounting up, as it were, to a single parentspeech, is based on the evidence of grammar and roots. Unless the grammar agrees, no amount of similarity between the roots of two languages could warrant us in comparing them together and referring them to the same stock.
Page 20 - Though the historian may shake his head, though the physiologist may doubt, and the poet scorn the idea, all must yield before the facts furnished by language.
Page 19 - If ethnology demonstrates kinship of race, kinship of speech may be used to support the argument; but we cannot reverse the process, and argue from language to race. To do so is to repeat the error of third-hand writers on language, who claim the black-skinned Hindu as a brother, on the ground of linguistic relationship, or identify the
Page 29 - Vedic md-si), sometimes had no termination at all, the verb of the undivided Aryan community possessed no other tenses or moods. It was left to the separate branches of the family each to work out its verbal system in its new home and in its own way, adding new forms, forgetting others, now amalgamating,
Page 165 - So far back as we can go in the history of Indo-European speech, the two classes of gutturals exist side by side, and the groups of words containing them remain unallied and unmixed.

Bibliographic information