Asian America: Forming New Communities, Expanding Boundaries

Front Cover
Huping Ling
Rutgers University Press, Apr 29, 2009 - Social Science - 304 pages
0 Reviews
The last half century witnessed a dramatic change in the geographic, ethnographic, and socioeconomic structure of Asian American communities. While traditional enclaves were strengthened by waves of recent immigrants, native-born Asian Americans also created new urban and suburban areas.

Asian America is the first comprehensive look at post-1960s Asian American communities in the United States and Canada. From Chinese Americans in Chicagoland to Vietnamese Americans in Orange County, this multi-disciplinary collection spans a wide comparative and panoramic scope. Contributors from an array of academic fields focus on global views of Asian American communities as well as on territorial and cultural boundaries.

Presenting groundbreaking perspectives, Asian America revises worn assumptions and examines current challenges Asian American communities face in the twenty-first century.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PART
23
Ethnic Solidarity Rebounding Networks and Transnational
45
PART
63
Little Saigon
87
Filipinasos in San Franciscos
104
A New Model
129
Building Chinese American Community
154
Virtual Community and the Cultural Imaginary
179
A Study
198
PART FOUR
221
Recent Mainland Chinese Immigrants
244
Selected Bibliography
263
Notes on Contributors
285
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Huping Ling is a professor of history at Truman State University. She is the executive editor of the Journal of Asian American Studies and an award-winning author and editor of ten books, including Emerging Voices (Rutgers University Press), Voices of the Heart, Chinese St. Louis, and Surviving on the Gold Mountain.

Bibliographic information