Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life, Volume 2

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B. Tauchnitz, 1849 - England - 423 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
10
III
18
IV
27
V
38
VI
60
VII
79
VIII
89
XX
247
XXI
255
XXII
265
XXIII
277
XXIV
289
XXV
298
XXVI
306
XXVII
310

IX
106
X
124
XI
139
XII
154
XIII
164
XIV
175
XV
187
XVI
200
XVII
211
XVIII
222
XIX
235
XXVIII
318
XXIX
325
XXX
331
XXXI
336
XXXII
341
XXXIII
361
XXXIV
374
XXXV
387
XXXVI
401
XXXVII
408
XXXVIII
418

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Page 418 - Touch us gently, Time ! Let us glide adown thy stream Gently, — as we sometimes glide Through a quiet dream ! Humble voyagers are We, Husband, wife, and children three — (One is lost, — an angel, fled To the azure overhead ! ) Touch us gently, Time ! We've not proud nor soaring wings : Our ambition, our content Lies in simple things. Humble voyagers are We, O'er Life's dim unsounded sea, Seeking only some calm clime : — Touch us gently, gentle Time ! EBENEZER ELLIOTT.
Page 8 - We're their slaves as long as we can work ; we pile up their fortunes with the sweat of our brows, and yet we are to live as separate as if we were in two worlds ; ay, as separate as Dives and Lazarus, with a great gulf betwixt us : but I know who was best off then,'' and he wound up his speech with a low chuckle that had no mirth in it.
Page 189 - No education had given him wisdom; and without wisdom, even love, with all its effects, too often works but harm. He acted to the best of his judgment, but it was a widely-erring judgment. The actions of the uneducated seem to me typified in those of Frankenstein, that monster of many human qualities, ungifted with a soul, a knowledge of the difference between good and evil.
Page 361 - FEAR no more the heat o' the sun Nor the furious winter's rages ; Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages : Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust. Fear no more the frown o...
Page 235 - Fantastic passions! maddening brawl! And shame and terror over all! Deeds to be hid which were not hid, Which all confused I could not know Whether I suffered, or I did: For all seemed guilt, remorse or woe, My own or others still the same Life-stifling fear, soul-stifling shame.
Page 318 - A WET sheet and a flowing sea, A wind that follows fast And fills the white and rustling sail And bends the gallant mast; And bends the gallant mast, my boys. While like the eagle free Away the good ship flies, and leaves Old England on the lee. O for a soft and gentle wind...
Page 139 - Mary, canst thou wreck his peace, Wha for thy sake wad gladly die? Or canst thou break that heart of his, Whase only faut is loving thee ? If love for love thou wilt na gie, At least be pity to me shown ! A thought ungentle canna be The thought o
Page 204 - While the men had stood grouped near the door, on their first entrance, Mr. Harry Carson had taken out his silver pencil, and had drawn an admirable caricature of them — lank, ragged, dispirited, and famine-stricken. Underneath he wrote a hasty quotation from the fat knight's well-known speech in Henry IV.
Page 154 - THE MAID'S LAMENT. I loved him not ; and yet now he is gone I feel I am alone. I check'd him while he spoke ; yet could he speak Alas ! I would not check. For reasons not to love him once I sought, And wearied all my thought To vex myself and him : I now would give My love could he but live Who lately lived for me, and when he found Twas vain, in holy ground He hid his face amid the shades of death. I waste for him my breath Who wasted his for me : but mine returns, And this...