An EncyclopŠaedia of Domestic Economy: Comprising Such Subjects as are Most Immediately Connected with Housekeeping As, the Construction of Domestic Edifices, with the Modes of Warming, Ventilating, and Lighting Them; a Description of the Various Articles of Furniture; a General Account of the Animal and Vegetable Substances Used as Food, and the Methods of Preserving and Preparing Them by Cooking; Making Breads Materials Employed in Dress and the Toilet; Business of the Laundry; Description of the Various Wheel Carriages; Preservation of Health, Domestic Medicines, &c.[ &c, Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1845 - 1238 pages
 

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Contents

Moonstone ih III Various Qualities in a Horse 1
109
Apparatus for Roasting 812
122
ON The WArious textile FAbrics
126
Chemical Principles of Ventilation
127
ARTIFICIAL il LUMINATION
140
On Starch 1055 ║ I
143
Spinning and Weaving
145
Page
152
Apparatus for Frying 819
162
Furniture of the Kitchen and other Offices 835
198
Illumination by Means of
199
General Observations
207
Pumps and List of Furniture of the Kitchen
221
Caoutchouc or india Rubber
225
Substances for Scouring and Polishing
236
History of Furniture
242
Present Style of Furniture
248
xill║ Tanks and Cisterns for preserving 10 s║ld Raspberry wine
249
Mucilage 464 1 Rhubard 10
252
Furniture of the Entrance Hall
287
Chocolate and Cocoa 716
306
Invalid Furniture
307
Earthenware including Porcelain
313
Ironing and Mangling 1061 X Aviary vi
331
PRACTICAL HOUSEHOLD DETAILs connecteD
346
850
358
Cleaning Grates Fireirons Fenders c 37 2
372
1 Cleaning China Earthenware and Glass
373
Cleaning Plated Wares and British Ware
374
Cleansing Kitchen Utensils of Metal c ib W Cleanliness a Means of Exemption from troublesome Insects
375
Fleas and Bugs
376
The House Fly
377
BOOK WII on Food Chapter I
378
Manner in which Nutrition is performed
379
IW On the chemical Difference between Animal and Vegetable Substances considered with relation to their Use as Food
381
CHAPTER II
383
Examination of the various Parts of Animals with a view to their employment as Food
384
Proximate Principles ib 3 Skin
387
Cellular Membrane
388
Flesh ib 6 Bone
389
Wii Rabbit ib VIII Hare
402
I Milk and the Varieties of Food prepared from it 403 b General Remarks Properties of Cows Milk Artificial Coagulation of Milk
403
Whey
404
Skimmed Milk Milk considered as an Aliment
405
1 General Remarks 2 General Principles of the Formation of Butter
408
Properties of Butter
409
Varieties of Butter used in England ib 5 Buttermilk
410
405 i 2 Varieties of Cheese
411
I Introductory Observations
414
Common or Domestic Fowl
416
Guineafowl
417
W Pheasant VI Partridge
418
Bustard VIII Quail IX Peacock X Swan
419
Goose
420
Duck
421
Widgeon XIV Teal XV Pigeon
422
Lark XVII Crane XVIII Snipe XIX Plover XX Lapwing
423
Red Grouse XXII Black Grouse XXIII Woodland Grouse XXIV White Grouse XXV Woodcock
424
Pum Kittiwake and Auk XXVII Swallow XXVIII Wheatear XXIX Landrail or Corncrake XXX Ortolan XXXI Eggs
425
I General Observations on Fish II Saltwater Fish
427
Turbot Sole
428
Brill
430
Flounder Dab Plaice Halibut Common
433
Haddock
434
Whiting 11 Ling 12 Torsk or Tusk 13 Coalfish 14 Mackerel
435
Smelt 16 Gurnard 7 Conger
436
Skate 19 Striped Red Mullet 20 Gray Mullet
437
Herring 22 Pilchard 23 Sprat
438
White Bait 25 Shad 26 Anchovy
439
Doru or John Dory 28 Sturgeon
440
Tunny 30 Sea Lamprey 31 Weaver
441
1 Salmon
442
Salmon Trout 3 Bull Trout 4 Common Trout 5 Samlet 6 Charr 7 Grayling 8 Gwinead
445
Pike 10 Carp 11 Perch
446
Roach 13 Freshwater Bream 14 Tench 15 Gudgeon
447
Barbel 17 Dace
448
Y║ ║ 467 6 8 ii
459
le ║ 7 Rue and Hyssop
470
W Gravies 884
489

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Page 161 - Be it known that I, John Fitch, of Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and improved mode of preventing steam-boilers from bursting, and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters of reference marked thereon.
Page 225 - The feathers when thoroughly moistened will sink down, and should remain in the lime water three or four days, after which the foul liquor should be separated from them by laying them on a sieve. The feathers should be afterwards well washed in clean water, and dried upon nets, the meshes of which may be about the fineness of cabbage nets. The feathers must be from time to time shaken upon the nets, and as they dry will fall through the meshes, and are to be collected for use.
Page 456 - ... walks elate, and as it were on tiptoe, feeding with great earnestness in a morning, so sure will it rain before night. It is totally a diurnal animal, and never pretends to stir after it becomes dark. The tortoise...
Page 289 - ... and thereto a sack of chaff to rest his head upon, he thought himself to be as well lodged as the lord of the town, that peradventure lay seldom in a bed of down or whole feathers...
Page 161 - Be it known that I, SIDNEY A. BEERS, of the city of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and. State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in...
Page 343 - Italian fashion by this forked cutting of meate, not only while I was in Italy, but also in Germany, and oftentimes in England since I came home. Being once quipped for that frequent using of my forke by a certain learned Gentleman, a familiar friend of mine, one Mr.
Page 343 - I myself thought good to imitate the Italian fashion by this forked cutting of meat, not only while I was in Italy, but also in Germany, and oftentimes in England since I came home...
Page 225 - Since this work was printed off, I have seen a substance excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the marks of a black lead pencil.
Page 343 - Italian, and also most strangers that are commorant in Italy, do always at their meals use a little fork when they cut their meat.
Page 343 - This form of feeding I understand is generally used in all places of Italy, their forks being for the most part made of iron or steel, and some of silver, but those are used only by gentlemen. The reason of this their curiosity is because the Italian cannot by any means endure to ha.ve his dish touched with fingers, seeing all men's fingers are not alike clean.

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