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STATEMENT OF STEPHEN M. DUNCAN, ASSISTANT SECRETARY

OF DEFENSE FOR RESERVE AFFAIRS, ACCOMPANIED BY LT.
GEN. HERBERT R. TEMPLE, JR., ARNGUS, CHIEF, NATIONAL
GUARD BUREAU; MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM F. WARD, JR., USAR,
CHIEF, OFFICE OF RESERVE; MAJ. GEN. DONALD BURDICK,
ARNGUS, DIRECTOR, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD; REAR ADM. F.N.
SMITH, USNR, CHIEF, NAVAL RESERVE; MAJ. GEN. J.W. MOORE,
USMC, DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, RESERVE AFFAIRS; MAJ. GEN.
JOHN B. CONAWAY, ANG, DIRECTOR, AIR NATIONAL GUARD;
MAJ. GEN. ROGER P. SCHEER, USAFR, CHIEF OF AIR FORCE RE-
SERVE; AND REAR ADM. PAUL A. WELLING, USCG, CHIEF,
OFFICE OF READINESS AND RESERVE
Mr. DUNCAN. Thank you, Senator.

Sir, I will try to be brief, and I thought it might be helpful in order for us to be able to spend maximum time responding to any questions the committee may have to just briefly summarize some of the developments that have taken place with the Guard and Reserve in the last few months, I recognize that you may have questions that go to budgetary items.

In quick summary, several developments have taken place. First of all, as you know, last October we had our first “no notice” exercise of the President's authority under 10 U.S.C. 673(b) to exercise his right to call to active duty 200,000 members of the Selected Reserve. We think that the results generally are very good. That exercise took place in October 1987. I can speak in greater detail about the exercise should you have any questions.

In fiscal year 1987, we also established the IRR screening policy. We have now gone through one complete yearly cycle of that search, something in the neighborhood of one-third of all members of Selected Reserve have been screened. The second one-third is scheduled for this next year.

That screening has had some very positive benefits, and we have required a lot of information that we needed. Some of the byproducts include use of the screening as a recruiting tool. We have been able to bring some people into the Selected Reserve after getting them out to their local Reserve Centers. I can talk about this development at greater length should you desire.

Another of the significant developments, of course, was the convening of the sixth QRMC, which for the first time is focusing on overall Reserve compensation. We have received an interim report from the QRMC, but the final report is not due until approximately June. I do expect several recommendations near the end of June from the QRMC.

Another more recent development occurred on March 3, when I released the results of the first comprehensive survey of the attitudes of members of the Selected Reserve. In 1986 we surveyed 52,000 enlisted personnel and 12,000 officers.

The reason I find this survey rather significant is because much of what we did in the way of managing the Selected Reserve in the past was based on intuition, and now we have rather good data that suggests to us what the Reserves think about. For example, their satisfaction with annual and weekend drills, their perceptions of promotion opportunities, their opinions on whether their training periods allow them to use their individual military skills, their perceptions of how their employers and their families respond to their service in the Reserve. That is going to be a very helpful management tool.

I would like to note for the record one additional matter relating to personnel. I am doing all that I can to encourage the Congress to focus on the Reserve Officer Personnel Management Act, KOPMA, this year. I believe that particular statute will give us the kind of management tool we need to have a good, uniform system for promotion. It will also allow the Department and individual Guard and Reserve officer greater ability to plan careers.

By way of brief summary, Mr. Chairman, I think it is fair to say that measured by several different standards on balance, the readiness of our National Guardsmen and Reserves has improved very significantly in recent years.

Having said that, and taking due credit for having done a lot of things right, I think we still have several challenges. I think we could summarize it by saying we have made a good start, but a great deal remains to be done. We are ready to tackle those challenges.

With that, Mr. Chairman, I have concluded. I will be happy to respond to any questions the committee may have.

[The prepared statements of Mr. Duncan, General Temple, General Ward, General Burdick, Admiral Smith, General Moore, General Conaway, General Scheer and Admiral Welling follow:]

STATEMENT OF

THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

FOR RESERVE AFFAIRS

HON. STEPHEN M. DUNCAN

Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee:

I'm very happy to be here today in my first appearance before this committee as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for

Reserve Affairs.

Under the Total Force Policy, we have increasingly based the

national security interests of our nation on our ability to

mobilize, deploy, and employ combat ready Reserve component units and members anywhere in the world. Today many of our military contingency plans cannot be executed effectively without committing National Guard and Reserve Forces in the same time

frame as our Active Forces.

This kind of reliance on our Reserve

Forces requires that units of the Selected Reserve, especially

the early deploying units, be manned and equipped at levels which

make them ready for combat.

This has been one of our primary

goals and it will continue to be one of our most difficult

challenges during this time of severe budgetary constraints.

Significant progress has been made in the training and equipping of the Reserve components as the size of our Reserve Forces has increased. I solicit your active support to ensure

that we have the resources that are necessary for the maintenance

of highly trained and ready Reserve Forces.

I also solicit your

support of legislation which will help us better manage the

reserve officer force.

One of the most significant developments of 1987 was the convening of the sixth Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation on January 1, 1987, as required by law. President

Reagan, in his directions to the Secretary, stated:

"I am particularly interested
in the compensation of the Reserve
components, which have an increasingly
critical role in the defense of our
country. We must provide our military
services with pay and benefit programs
that encourage large numbers of qualified
men and women to serve in Guard and
Reserve units.

The price of this commitment
is not small, but I want to assure
the American people that it is no
larger than the nation's security
requires. Consequently, this quadrennial
review should undertake a comprehensive
evaluation of the benefits and costs of
all reserve compensation programs.

Because this is the first review to deal with reserve

compensation issues, we expect to see a significant number of

recommendations in the final report.

This year we have again submitted a request for legislation

which will provide a comprehensive revision to the Reserve officers Personnel Act (ROPA), which was enacted in 1954. The legislation which we propose is entitled the "Reserve Officer Personnel Management Act" (ROPMA). The legislation will provide a visible, uniform, and improved officer personnel management system for reserve officers. It is closely patterned after the

Defense officer Personnel Management Act which was enacted in

1980 for the management of Active force officers.

I will discuss

this legislation in greater detail later in my Statement.

In the amended budget request for FY 1989, we also seek an

additional 395 military technicians. Military technicians are, of course, civilian employees who provide full time support for administration, training and maintenance in selected reserve

units.

As a condition of employment, military technicians are

required to maintain their status as drilling reservists in their

reserve unit.

The technician program has proven to be a cost

effective means for administering the selected Reserve and I urge

you to favorably consider this request.

FY 1989 Amended Budget Request

The specific budget estimates in the President's Amended Budget Request, exclusive of procurement funds (which are not obtainable by component), for the Reserve components are as follows:

TABLE 1
TOA ($ In Millions)

[blocks in formation]

RESERVE

MILPAY
O&M
MILCON

277.3
64.0
16.5

295.4
69.5
33.4

315.7
77.5
14.2

TOTAL

357.8

398.3

407.4

AIR NATIONAL

GUARD

MILPAY
O&M
MILCON

947.8
1,787.5

148.9

988.2 1,958.1

151.3

1,027.4 1,965.4

147.5

TOTAL

2,884.2

3,097.6

3,140.3

AIR FORCE RESERVE

MILPAY
O&M
MILCON

569.3
924.6
58.9

615.1 1,001.0

79.3

655.3 1,028.5

58.8

TOTAL

1,552.8

1,695.4

1,742.6

TOTAL DOD

MILPAY
O&M
MILCON

8,381.6
6,168.2

480.0

8,908.9
6,672.5

583.8

9,205.1 6,642.5

472.9

TOTAL

19,029.8

15,165.2

16,320.5

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