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19880

Pt.5

COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

SAM NUNN, Georgia, Chairman JOHN C. STENNIS, Mississippi

JOHN W. WARNER, Virginia J. JAMES EXON, Nebraska

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina CARL LEVIN, Michigan

GORDON J. HUMPHREY, New Hampshire EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts WILLIAM S. COHEN, Maine JEFF BINGAMAN, New Mexico

DAN QUAYLE, Indiana ALAN J. DIXON, Illinois

PETE WILSON, California JOHN GLENN, Ohio

PHIL GRAMM, Texas ALBERT GORE, JR., Tennessee

STEVEN D. SYMMS, Idaho TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado

JOHN MCCAIN, Arizona
RICHARD C. SHELBY, Alabama

ARNOLD L. PUNARO, Staff Director
CARL M. SMITH, Staff Director for the Minority

JEFFREY H. SMITH, General Counsel
CHRISTINE COWART DAUTH, Chief Clerk

SUBCOMMITTEE ON MANPOWER AND PERSONNEL

JOHN GLENN, Ohio, Chairman J. JAMES EXON, Nebraska

PETE WILSON, California EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts STEVEN D. SYMMS, Idaho RICHARD C. SHELBY, Alabama

JOHN MCCAIN, Arizona

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CONTENTS

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF WITNESSES

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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION FOR APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1989

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1988

U.S. SENATE,
MANPOWER AND PERSONNEL SUBCOMMITTEE,
COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES,

Washington, DC MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS FOR THE TOTAL FORCE The subcommittee met in open session, pursuant to notice, at 9:30 a.m., Senator John Glenn (chairman) presiding.

Present: Senators Glenn, Wilson, and McCain.

Staff present: Patrick A. Tucker, minority counsel; David S. Lyles, Frederick F.Y. Pang, and Patricia L. Watson, professional staff members; Debra A. Rice, staff assistant.

Also present: Phillip P. Upschulte, assistant to Senator Glenn; Jeffrey B. Subko, assistant to Senator Exon; Wiliam J. Wight, assistant to Senator Warner; Samuel J. Routson, assistant to Senator Symms; and Anthony H. Cordesman, assistant to Senator McCain.

OPENING STATEMENT OF SENATOR JOHN GLENN, CHAIRMAN Senator GLENN. I call the committee to order.

Before we proceed with the hearing this morning, I just want to take a minute to note the attendance with us this morning of a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Capt. Thomas Kelley of the Navy, who is here today in support of Admiral Edney. Captain Kelley is a native of Boston. He entered the Navy through the OCS program after graduation from Holy Cross.

He served as commander, River Assault Division 152, in Vietnam. On June 15, 1969, when then Lieutenant Kelley, he was in charge of a column of eight river assault crafts which were extracting a company of Army infantry troops from an overrun position.

In the heat of that battle Lieutenant Kelley, at the risk of his own life, maneuvered his craft to the exposed side of a protective cordon that he had formed. In direct line of the enemy's fire, he ordered his craft to fire on the enemy in order to cover the evacuation. His boat took direct hits, resulting in serious injury to him, and he continued to lead his men until the enemy was silenced.

After recovery from his injuries, Captain Kelley served on various destroyers and commanded the U.S.S. Land and the Military Sealift Command Far East. He is now assigned as Special Assistant for Legislative Coordination on Vice Admiral Edney's staff.

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Captain Kelley, any time I am around anybody that got the Congressional, I try to take note of that. Would you please stand and be recognized. [Applause.]

The Subcommittee on Manpower and Personnel meets this morning to begin the first of three hearings on the manpower portion of the revised Department of Defense budget authorization request for fiscal year 1989. Today's hearing will focus on the manpower requirements of the armed services.

The next hearing, which is scheduled for the 24th of March, will focus on recruiting, retention, and compensation. And the third hearing, which is scheduled for the 29th of March, will focus on wartime and peacetime medical programs. That is the hearing we have talked a lot about in the last couple of years. It comes closer to being a war-stopper, I think, than anything else we have in this whole personnel area, that is the medical situation we find ourselves in.

On April 13, we will have a joint hearing with the Readiness Subcommittee regarding Army combat support and combat service support.

Last year, the Congress authorized a 2-year budget for the Department of Defense. The manpower portion authorized Active and Reserve force strength levels for each of the military services for fiscal year 1988 and 1989. For the Active force, Congress authorized military strength for fiscal year 1988 at the levels requested by the President.

This provided the Navy an increase of 6,200, and the Army an increase of 100 from the fiscal year 1987 levels. For the Reserve forces, the Congress authorized an increase in Selected Reserve strength of 19,800 or 60 percent of the increase requested by the President for fiscal year 1988. Included in this increase was an increase of 2,500 full-time personnel.

The Congress felt that the Reserve forces needed to correct individual skill qualification problems, reported as the second most critical factor limiting readiness in the Reserve forces, before adding much more to the manpower inventory of the Selected Re

For fiscal year 1989, the Congress authorized Active and Reserve force strengths at the same level it authorized for fiscal year 1988. The Congress did this in anticipation that a budget summit agreement, which none of us particularly liked but we went through and are saddled with anyway, the budget summit agreement in all likelihood would require the Department of Defense to develop adjusted strength levels for fiscal year 1989.

I know that the revised strength levels for fiscal year 1989 are the result of some very difficult choices that DOD has had to make in coming down to the $299.5 billion defense budget level agreed to by that budget summit. And I do want to address these adjustments in some detail later on in the hearing, because I believe we need to assure ourselves that the reduced levels requested are in fact the levels necessary to adequately sustain the programmed force structure in each of the military services.

Because of the compressed time frame in which the Department of Defense had to develop its revised budget for fiscal year 1989, much of the documentation that would normally accompany a

serve.

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