The Bug: A Novel

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Picador, Feb 28, 2012 - Fiction - 384 pages
1 Review

With a New Introduction by Mary Gaitskill

A PEN/Hemingway Award Finalist

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book

Ellen Ullman is a "rarity, a computer programmer with a poet's feeling for language" (Laura Miller, Salon). The Bug breaks new ground in literary fiction, offering us a deep look into the internal lives of people in the technical world. Set in a start-up company in 1984, this highly acclaimed first novel explores what happens when a baffling software flaw—a bug so teasing it is named "the Jester"—threatens the survival of the human beings who created it.

 

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THE BUG

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A blistering drama about love, hate, and psychopathy.Ullman, one of the first women in cyberspace, guided readers to the innermost circle of computerdom in the 1997 memoir Close to the Machine. Her ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - shawnr - LibraryThing

Ellen Ullman’s book, The Bug, is a cool kind of tech-based realism that I hope to see more of in the future. The book centers around a software tester, a programmer, their lovers, and the glitch that ... Read full review

Contents

PART ONE
1
PART TWO
85
PART THREE
155
PART FOUR
259
Programmers Postscript
351
Acknowledgments
353
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Ellen Ullman is an American computer programmer and author. She has written novels as well as articles for various publications, including Harper's Magazine, Wired, The New York Times, and Salon. Her essays and novels analyze the human side of the world of computer programming. Ullman earned a bachelor's degree in English at Cornell University in the early 1970s. She then turned to business programming in the following years. She eventually began writing about her experiences as a programmer in 1995 when she wrote an essay titled "Out of Time: Reflections on the Programming Life." She lives in San Francisco.

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