The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

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Little, Brown & Company, 1860

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Page 35 - Behind her farre away a Dwarfe did lag, That lasie seemd, in being ever last, Or wearied with bearing of her bag Of needments at his backe.
Page 36 - The Laurell, meed of mightie Conquerours And Poets sage ; the Firre that weepeth still ; The Willow worne of forlorne Paramours ; The Eugh, obedient to the benders will ; The Birch for shaftes ; the Sallow for the mill ; The Mirrhe sweete-bleeding in the bitter wound ; The Warlike Beech ; the Ash for nothing ill ; The fruitfull Olive ; and the Platane round ; The carver Holme ; the Maple seeldom inward sound.
Page 34 - Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore. And dead, as living, ever him ador'd : Upon his shield the like was also scorM, For soveraine hope which in his helpe he had.
Page 47 - He, making speedy way through spersed ayre, And through the world of waters wide and deepe, To Morpheus house doth hastily repaire. Amid the bowels of the earth full steepe, And low, where dawning day doth never peepe, His dwelling is ; there Tethys his wet bed Doth ever wash, and Cynthia still doth steepe In silver deaw his ever-drouping hed, Whiles sad Night over him her mantle black doth spred.
Page 34 - A lovely Ladie rode him faire beside, Upon a lowly Asse more white then snow, Yet she much whiter ; but the same did hide Under a vele, that wimpled...
Page 54 - By this the Northerne wagoner" had set His sevenfold teme behind the stedfast starre, That was in Ocean waves yet never wet, But firme is fixt, and sendeth light from farre To all, that in the wide deepe wandring arre: And chearefull Chaunticlere with his note shrill Had warned once, that Phoebus...
Page xxxi - Princes grace, yet want her Peeres; To have thy asking, yet waite manie yeeres; To fret thy soule with crosses and with cares; To eate thy heart through comfortlesse dispaires; To fawne, to crowche, to waite, to ride, to ronne, To spend, to give, to want, to be undonne.
Page 36 - Joying to heare the birdes sweete harmony, Which, therein shrouded from the tempest dred, Seemd in their song to scorne the cruell sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and hy, The sayling Pine ; the Cedar proud and tall ; The vine-propp Elme ; the Poplar never dry ; The builder Oake, sole king of forrests all ; The Aspine good for staves ; the Cypresse funerall...
Page 6 - I have followed all the antique Poets historicall; first Homere, who in the Persons of Agamemnon and Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis...
Page 48 - And more, to lulle him in his slumber soft, A trickling streame from high rock tumbling downe, And ever-drizling raine upon the loft, Mixt with a murmuring winde, much like the sowne Of swarming bees, did cast him in a swowne: No other noyse, nor peoples troublous cryes, As still are wont t' annoy the walled towne, Might there be heard : but carelesse Quiet lyes, Wrapt in eternall silence farre from enemyes.

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