Journal of the New England Water Works Association, Volume 22

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New England Water Works Association., 1908 - Water-supply

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Page 96 - If any such rule or regulation relates to a temporary source or act of contamination, any person violating such rule or regulation shall be liable to prosecution for misdemeanor for every such violation, and on...
Page 216 - Merrimac river to such an extent as to insure at all times a sufficient quantity of water for the use of the public in that city, or it may take water from any spring, pond or well, in Andover, North Andover, Tewksbury or North Reading: provided, that no source of water supply for domestic purposes shall be taken or used under this act without the approval of the state board of health, and that the location of all filter galleries and wells, and the design of...
Page 349 - Lynn, and the waters which flow into and from the same, and any water rights connected therewith ; and may take and hold by purchase or otherwise, such land on and around the margin of said...
Page 445 - To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled.
Page 360 - Resolved, That the President be authorized to appoint a committee of five to digest and report in detail as soon as practicable upon the time, place, and terms of the publication of such a journal, to elect an editor, fix his salary, and to arrange all other necessary details.
Page 390 - It has been shown that the present annual cut of forest products requires at least 20 billion cubic feet of wood. To produce this quantity of wood without impairing the capital stock our 700 million acres of forest must make an annual increment of 30 cubic feet per acre. Under present conditions of mismanagement and neglect it is safe to say that the average annual increment is less than 10 cubic feet per acre for the entire area. This means that each year's cut at the present rate takes the growth...
Page 391 - South of Pennsylvania there is, according to my reckoning based on observations in every State in that upland country, an aggregate area of not lest than three thousand square miles where the soil has been destroyed by the complete removal of the woods and the consequent passage of the earthy matter to the lowlands and to the sea. At the rate at which this process is now going on, the loss in arable and forestable land may fairly be reckoned at not less than 100 square miles per annum. In other words,...
Page 63 - Some New Facts Relating to the Effect of Meters on the Consumption of Water.
Page 279 - Chap. 435. The third section of this act empowered the city, among other things, to construct and maintain proper aqueducts and pipes, to establish public hydrants, to prescribe the purposes for which they should be used, and to change or discontinue the same; to distribute the water throughout the city and to regulate the use of said water, and establish and collect the prices to be paid therefor, and also to do any other acts or things necessary or convenient and proper for carrying out the provisions...
Page 362 - F + F. Covered Reservoirs. Frank L. Fuller. Gives experience in the use of concrete . in their construction and in making them watertight. 1800 w. Jour N Eng W-Wks Assn — June, 1909. No. 6463 F. A Huge Filtered Water Reservoir for London. Illustrations, with short description, looo w. Sei Am — July 3, 1909. No. 6090. World's Largest Covered Reservoir. An account of the opening of the Honor Oak reservoir. Ills. 1500 w. Surveyor...

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