Modern American Queer History

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Temple University Press, 2001 - History - 302 pages
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In the twentieth century, countless Americans claimed gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender identities, forming a movement to secure social as well as political equality. This collection of essays considers the history as well as the historiography of the queer identities and struggles that developed in the United States in the midst of widespread upheaval and change. Whether the subject is an individual life story, a community study, or an aspect of public policy, these essays illuminate the ways in which individuals in various locales understood the nature of their desires and the possibilities of resisting dominant views of normality and deviance. Theoretically informed, but accessible, the essays shed light too on the difficulties of writing history when documentary evidence is sparse or coded, Taken together these essays suggest that while some individuals and social networks might never emerge from the shadows, the persistent exploration of the past for their traces is an integral part of the on-going struggle for queer rights.
 

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Contents

Romantic Friendship
13
Jane Heap Margaret Anderson
24
The Lives
36
Elusive Identities
51
A Significant Other
69
The Lesbian and the Scientific Basis
103
Professionals in MidTwentiethCentury America
117
United States 19481973
131
Philadelphia
155
Politics
181
Building in Mississippi
198
The North Carolina Lesbian and Gay Health Project 19821996
227
the Public Debates on AIDS and Immigration
253
Gays in the Military Debate
271
Eaklor 285
300
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About the author (2001)

Allida M. Black is Director and Editor of The Eleanor Roosevelt and Human Rights Project, as well as Research Professor of History, The George Washington University.

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