Weekly Reader's Read Magazine Presents Simply Shakespeare: Readers Theatre for Young People

Front Cover
Jennifer L. Kroll
Libraries Unlimited, 2003 - Literary Collections - 233 pages


This collection of scripts includes readers theatre scripts based on Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, and romances. Each script includes a summary, presentation suggestions, and a character list.

You don't have to look any further to find the best of the Bard! From misalliances and misadventures to romance and comedy, students can explore the wonderful world of Shakespeare through Readers Theatre. This unique collection of 13 scripts from Weekly Reader's Read magazine features age-appropriate play adaptations from some of Shakespeare's greatest and best-known works. Magnificently preserving the flavor of Shakespeare's writings, the language has been modernized so that young readers can easily grasp and appreciate the characters and the plot. Each script is accompanied by a summary, presentation suggestions, and a character list.

The scripts can be used independently (for stand-alone performances) or as precursors to classroom units on Shakespeare (e.g., in conjunction with reading or viewing one of Shakespeare's plays in its original version).

Plays include:

- As You Like It

- Hamlet

- Julius Caesar

- King Lear

- Macbeth

- A Midsummer Night's Dream

- The Merchant of Venice

- Much Ado About Nothing

- Othello^L^DBL Romeo and Juliet

- The Taming of the Shrew

- The Tempest

- Twelfth Night

Grades 6-12

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Contents

As You Like It
1
Prince of Denmark
17
Julius Caesar
33
King Lear
51
Macbeth
69
A Midsummer Nights Dream
91
The Merchant of Venice
107
Much Ado About Nothing
121
Othello
139
Romeo and Juliet
161
Taming of the Shrew
179
The Tempest
199
Twelfth Night
213
Index of Scripts
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 46 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; •> I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil, that men do, lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones; \ So let it be with Caesar.
Page 221 - O mistress mine, where are you roaming? O stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low. Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.
Page 144 - twas wondrous pitiful; She wished she had not heard it, yet she wished That heaven had made her such a man; she thanked me, And bade me, if I had a friend that loved her, I should but teach him how to tell my story, And that would woo her. Upon this hint I spake; She loved me for the dangers I had passed, And I loved her that she did pity them.
Page 45 - As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honor him; but, as he was ambitious, I slew him.
Page 98 - Philomel, with melody Sing in our sweet lullaby; Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby : Never harm, Nor spell nor charm, Come our lovely lady nigh , So, good night, with lullaby.
Page 85 - Fie, my lord, fie ! a soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account? Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him? Doct. Do you mark that? Lady M. The thane of Fife had a wife; where is she now? What, will these hands ne'er be clean? No more o' that, my lord, no more o' that: you mar all with this starting.
Page 83 - Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake : Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog...
Page 87 - Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow creeps in this petty place from day to day, to the last syllable of recorded time; and all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death.
Page 86 - Here's the smell of blood still ; all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.
Page 75 - For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

About the author (2003)

JENNIFER L. KROLL is Senior Editor at Weekly Reader.

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