Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical Prefaces, Volume 10

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John Aikin
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, 1821 - English poetry - 807 pages
 

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Page 199 - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A trainband captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 202 - Now see him mounted once again Upon his nimble steed, Full slowly pacing o'er the stones With caution and good heed.
Page 84 - Knowledge and wisdom, far from being one, Have ofttimes no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men, Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
Page 200 - I am a linen-draper bold, As all the world doth know, And my good friend, the Calender, Will lend his horse to go.
Page 81 - From thee departing they are lost, and rove At random without honour, hope, or peace. From thee is all that soothes the life of man, His high endeavour, and his glad success, His strength to suffer, and his will to serve. But...
Page 100 - The sum is this : If man's convenience, health, Or safety, interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs. Else they are all, the meanest things that are, As free to live and to enjoy that life As God was free to form them at the first, Who in his sovereign wisdom made them all.
Page 201 - For saddle-tree scarce reached had he, His journey to begin, When, turning round his head, he saw Three customers come in. So down he came; for loss of time, Although it grieved him sore, Yet loss of pence, full well he knew, Would trouble him much more.
Page 31 - Shortening his journey between morn and noon, . And hurrying him, impatient of his stay, Down to the rosy west ; but kindly still Compensating...
Page 27 - And having dropped the expected bag — pass on. He whistles as he goes, light-hearted wretch, Cold and yet cheerful : messenger of grief Perhaps to thousands, and of joy to some, To him indifferent whether grief or joy.
Page 207 - The youth did ride, and soon did meet John coming back amain ! Whom in a trice he tried to stop, By catching at his rein : But not performing what he meant, And gladly would have done, The frighted steed he frighted more, And made him faster run. Away went Gilpin, and away Went post-boy at his heels, The post-boy's horse right glad to miss The lumbering of the wheels.

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