A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations, Volume 20

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1816 - Trials
 

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Page 657 - In contempt of our said Lord the King, in open violation of the laws of this kingdom, to the evil and pernicious example of all others in the like case offending, and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his crown and dignity.
Page 813 - They feel and resent, as they ought to do, that invariable, undistinguishing favour with which the guards are treated; while those gallant troops, by whom every hazardous, every laborious service is performed, are left to perish in garrisons abroad, or pine in quarters at home, neglected and forgotten.
Page 247 - ... you, or by such further powers, instructions and authorities, as shall at any time hereafter be granted or appointed you, under our signet, and sign manual, or by our order in our privy council...
Page 19 - To bereave a man of life, or by violence to confiscate his estate without accusation or trial, would be so gross and notorious an act of despotism as must at once convey the alarm of tyranny throughout the whole...
Page 243 - ... for the hearing and determining all causes, as well criminal as civil, according to law and equity, and, as near as may be, agreeable to the laws of England...
Page 249 - Ordinances are not to be repugnant, but as near as may be agreeable, to the Laws and Statutes of this our Kingdom of Great Britain.
Page 805 - ... you heard it in the complaints of your people. It is not however too late to correct the error of your education. We are still inclined to make an indulgent allowance for the pernicious lessons you received in your youth, and to form the most sanguine hopes from the natural benevolence of your disposition.'' We are far from thinking you capable of a direct deliberate purpose to invade those original rights of your subjects, on which all their civil and political liberties depend. Had it been...
Page 81 - The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political; but only...
Page 817 - To honour them with a determined predilection and confidence in -exclusion of your English subjects, who placed your family, and, in spite of treachery and rebellion, have supported it upon the throne, is a mistake too gross even for the unsuspecting generosity of youth. In this error we see a capital violation of the most obvious rules of policy and prudence. We trace it, however, to an original bias in your education, and are ready to allow for your inexperience.
Page 805 - You found them pleased with the novelty of a young prince, whose countenance promised even more than his words, and loyal to you not only from principle but passion. It was not a cold profession of allegiance to the first magistrate, but a partial animated attachment to a favourite prince, the native of their country.

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