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FIFTY YEARS BEFORE THE PUBLIC upon their excellence alone have attained an UNPURCHASED PRE

EMINENCE, which establishes them as unequalled in
TONE, TOUCH, WORKMANSHIP, AND DURABILITY.
Warerooms : 112 Finh Avenue, New York; 204 & 206 Baltimore St., Baltimore.

PIANOS KNABE

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POTTER'S AMERICAN MONTHLY.

DECEMBER, 1881.-CONTENTS.

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A Famous Old Church,

. H. W. FRENCH

481 Autumnal Pictures

GEORGE BANCROFT GRIFFITH

494 The Author of "Bitter Sweet"

A. J. H, DUGANNE.

495 Daydawn ...

A. M. M..

- 499 A Christmas Gift

M. J. S.

500 Kith and Kin-CHAPTERS XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII

THE AUTHOR OF “The First VIOLIN" .505 The State and the Railway

JAMES CLEMENT AMBROSE

· 517 Another World Down Here

W. M. WILLIAMS

526 “Out of her Sphere” . .

AMANDA B. HARRIS

533 An Experience with Modern Ghosts—Part. III.

E. P. B.

542 A Man without a Country .

547 Message from the Dead.

C.B..

551 The Woodland Glen .

S. G. GREEN

552 Under the Snow .

A. L. BASSETT.

553 Comparisons.

ADDISON F. BROWNE .

556 Novelties in Fancy-work

MARIAN FORD

557 Current Topics:

Gold and Silver Production—The Newark Bank Failure—The Assassin Guiteau-Commercial Speculation
The Spelling Reform .

562 Literature and Art:

Sabine's Falsehood—No Gentleman—Barbarine- The Story of Four Acorns—Bertha's Baby-Country By.

ways—Water-Lilies, and other Poems—Garfield's Words—Home Ballads–Martin Luther and his WorkKing's Mountain and its Heroes—The Fate of Madam La Tour— The Bivouac of the Dead-Campaigns of the Civil War

• 565 Home and Society: Deluded Mothers—Training the Child-Failure-Family Courtesy . .

570 Pot-Pourri:

Incidents of Camp and Field Life-Fish Yarns-An Anecdote of the American Stage-A Judicial Decision Extraordinary-Day and Martin's Miscarried Notes . ..

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. AMONG THE BELLS. 481 | ANT LIONS

527 THE COLONIAL BELL-RINGER

482 THE RED ANT . INTERIOR OF CHRIST CHURCH, BOSTON

483 | ANT-BENDING NAVE AND ORGAN, AS DECORATED FOR APRIL 18, A HANGING WASP NEST

. 529 1875. 484 INTERIOR OF HANGING WASP NEST

530 The NAPOLEON WILLOW, Copp's HILL 485 NESTS OF ADULT INSECTS

• 531 The MATHER TOMB, Copp's Hill 485 GARDEN SPIDER

532 COMMUNION SERVICE ARRANGED ON THE ALTAR ALLEGORICAL—THE WOODLAND GLEN

552 TABLE

487 CURTAIN WITH CROSS-STITCH EMBROIDERY AND THE PURSUIT OF PAUL REVERE.

489
DRAWN-WORK.

557 The COLONIAL CEMETERY, COPP's HILL

491 PART OF WINDOW-CURTAIN, WITH IRISH LACE-WORK, THE CLARK TOMB 492 DRAWN-WORK, AND LANGUETTE EMBROIDERY

558 THE OLDEST TOMBSTONE IN AMERICA 493 COVER FOR SMALL FANCY TABLE.

559 Dr. Josiah GILBERT HOLLAND 495 EMBROIDERED FOOT-WARMER

. 560 CHRISTMAS DAY IN A GERMAN HOME. 500 | EMBROIDERED SACHET BORDER

561

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JOHN E. POTTER & COMPANY, Publishers,

617 Sansom Street, Philadelphia,

Vol. XVII.

DECEMBER, 1881.

No. 120.

A FAMOUS OLD CHURCH.

By H. W. FRENCH.

CHRIST CHURCH, on Salem street, Boston, is the famous old North church of Paul Revere. It is the oldest ecclesiastical and, with the exception of the old State House, the oldest public building in the city. And now it is going to decay, they say, spiritually, bodily, and financially—those who are really more ready to have it die than live. They are not an unimportant element, these destructionists, in the great provincial city called the Hub, but are almost a physical necessity, to counterbalance that other persistent passion for the preservation of antiquities. Were it not for this contra mania, Boston of a century or more ago would long since have been pickled and laid upon the shelf, to remain just as it was, for centuries and centuries yet to come.

It is much the same feeling that a few years ago declared that the Old South must go.

But while the Old South has indeed been dismantled till the bare shell and the angular spire are really all that remain,that illustrious pile of brick for which the illustrious ladies of Boston are still vigorously fighting,-Christ church, though older by several years, has changed very little since the spirited communicants of '76 turned out their too Tory pastor and locked the church doors, suspending worship for the time in order to keep him out; since the the Old South have struggled to redeem it from British officers held that famous council of war destruction ; but in the act they have surely reft it under its shadow ; since Lafayette stood before of every vestige of sacerdotal dignity; while with the altar, and the signal-lights shone in the belfry. the other the historic chime still cheers the heart, The little colonial grass-plot is still green before the historic organ still lifts the soul, the old chancel it, and the famous colonial cemetery is on Copp's still echoes to the voice of prayer from the same Hill, just beyond.

altar, and still the belfry arch of the North church In fashionable carnivals of authors, sacred fairs, spire is a signal-light over a living and active dignified mask balls, and various other solemn and house of God. gilt-edged entertainments, such as the exhibition Chronic grumblers said that the Old South of the divine discoveries of Edison, the friends o must go, because it stood too near the busy bustle

VOL. XVII.-31.

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AMONG THE BELLS.

of the modern world. The North church they communicants. To-day there are over one hundoom because it stands too far away from it. But dred and twenty families in the parish and more what friends have so eagerly done for the Old than one hundred and sixty communicants. There South, circumstances are doing better for her have been one hundred and sixty-two confirmaelder sister. The class of residents has been tions during the eleven years' rectorship of the perceptibly improving about the church that a Rev. Dr. Burroughs. And as for the external

church, with its solid old walls of colonial brick, two and a half feet thick, laid in that durable style called “English bond," with the north wall carefully protected by a clapboard sheathing, it is as young to-day as a century and a half ago.

The time to visit this ecclesiastical veteran is when it is completely caparisoned in its reliquiæ and traditive habiliments and the altar is garnished with that famous service of plate that alone is worth a visit to Christ church to see.

The gray brick walls and the angular tower surmounted by its woodwork spire stretching one hundred feet upward will attract your attention long before you reach the spot. Unfortunately, the woodwork about the belfry tower is not the same as when Robert Newman held the lanterns as directed by Paul Revere, for in the terrific gale of 1804 the spire was blown down and went through the roof of a low house standing beside it. It is precisely the same in its model, however.

The doorway is not broad, for it was built in those days when narrow was the gate and straight the way that led to life. It was almost too narrow, indeed, to meet the demands of fashion in the period of immense hoop-skirts that has intervened between that time and this. A Boston wag, well-known in his day and generation, was sitting on the curb by the church, one Sunday morning, looking toward the old cemetery, and thinking, perhaps, of the rhyme of the sexton, when his eyes were directed to a lady who was evidently suffering a specific mental

doubt as to her ability to enter the church. few years ago had reached a very low standard, Thereupon he prepared a revised version of the offering little support to the congregation, and old song, beginningmaking the ways of access exceedingly disagreeable. In 1874 the church had already begun its

“Nigh to a church, in her robes arrayed,

Stood a lady fair, and thus she said: rejuvenation, and it was then announced with * Too bad ! too bad! that I must wait pride that the parish numbered one hundred fam

While they measure the breadth of this open gate.

Ah! 'tis only seven feet, six, I see ! ilies, and the church one hundred and twenty Too narrow! too narrow, alas! for me.' "

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THE COLONIAL BELL-RINGER.

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