The Essentials of Argumentation

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D. C. Heath & Company, 1898 - Debates and debating - 412 pages

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Page 348 - Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
Page 342 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause ; and be silent that you may hear : believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 96 - Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead ? " But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen.
Page 228 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason and justice tell me I ought to do.
Page 346 - tis his will : Let but the Commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read,) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood...
Page 115 - If an instance in which the phenomenon under investigation occurs, and an instance in which it does not occur, have every circumstance in common save one, that one occurring only in the former; the circumstance in which alone the two instances differ is the effect, or the cause, or an indispensable part of the cause, of the phenomenon.
Page 347 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on ; Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii. Look ! in this place, ran Cassius...
Page 261 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Page 345 - He was my friend, faithful and just to me; But Brutus says he was ambitious, And Brutus is an honourable man.
Page 25 - First, sir, permit me to observe that the use of force alone is but temporary. It may subdue for a moment ; but it does not remove the necessity of subduing again : and a nation is not governed, which is perpetually to be conquered.

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