The Teahouse: Small Business, Everyday Culture, and Public Politics in Chengdu, 1900-1950

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Stanford University Press, 2008 - History - 355 pages
This is the first book-length history of Chinese teahouses in the English-speaking world or in China. The Teahouse examines economic, social, political, and cultural changes as funneled through the teahouses of Chengdu during the first half of the twentieth century. The images brought together in this work paint a complete picture of everyday culture in the most basic unit of public life. This microhistorical examination of the teahouse and public life takes us into the heart of a city to explore urban society in depth, and provides a new way to look at the Chinese city and at daily life.
 

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Contents

VII
27
VIII
57
IX
84
X
111
XI
113
XII
135
XIII
167
XIV
201
XVI
224
XVII
249
XVIII
265
XIX
267
XX
285
XXI
323
XXII
341
Copyright

XV
203

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Page xiii - Council [SSRC]), which he chaired for six years, from 1964 to 1970; the Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China (sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences...

About the author (2008)

Di Wang is Professor of History at Texas A&M University. He is also the author of Street Culture in Chengdu: Public Space, Urban Commoners, and Local Politics, 1870-1930 (Stanford, 2003).

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