Plant Systematics

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Academic Press, Aug 9, 2011 - Science - 608 pages
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Plant Systematics contains the essential paradigms, concepts, and terms required for a basic understanding of plant systematics at the graduate or undergraduate level. Plant systematics is an area central to numerous other biological disciplines, and a large subset of plant scientists are required to take a course in plant systematics. Almost all ecologists, horticulturalists, plant developmental biologists, and plant pathologists are interested in plant systematics because it is central to their studies of the plants that form such a large part of every ecosystem and experimental system.

* The Henry Allan Gleason Award of The New York Botanical Garden, awarded for "Outstanding recent publication in the field of plant taxonomy, plant ecology, or plant geography" (2006)
* Contains numerous cladograms that illustrate the evolutionary relationships of major plant groups, with an emphasis on the adaptive significance of major evolutionary novelties
*Provides descriptions and classifications of major groups of angiosperms, including over 90 flowering plant families
* Includes a comprehensive glossary of plant morphological terms as well as appendices on botanical illustration and plant description
 

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Contents

EVOLUTION AND DIVERSITY OF PLANTS
49
SYSTEMATIC EVIDENCE AND DESCRIPTIVE TERMINOLOGY
345
RESOURCES IN PLANT SYSTEMATICS
493
APPENDIX 1 PLANT DESCRIPTION
535
APPENDIX 2 BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATIONS
541
APPENDIX 3 SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS IN PLANT SYSTEMATICS
545
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
547
INDEX
579
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Dr. Michael G. Simpson has been a professor of Biology at San Diego State University since 1986. His area of expertise is plant systematics, dealing with the description, identification, naming and classification of plants with the overriding goal of inferring the pattern of evolutionary history (phylogeny). Dr. Simpson has taught courses in Principles of Organismal Biology, Plant Systematics, Taxonomy of California Plants, Economic Botany, Genetics and Evolution, and Seminar in Systematics and Evolution. Additionally, he serves as the Curator of the SDSU Herbarium where he oversees the maintenance, organization, and use of the collection and facilitates additions to the herbarium. Currently, his field work in Chile and Argentina is supported in part by the National Geographic Society.

In addition to publishing numerous articles in technical journals, Dr. Simpson has authored of the widely used textbook Plant Systematics (Elsevier-Academic Press, 2006; 2nd ed. 2010.)

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