Daughters of Canaan: A Saga of Southern Women

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University Press of Kentucky, Mar 2, 1995 - Social Science - 281 pages

" From Gone with the Wind to Designing Women, images in film and fiction tend to obscure the diversity of American women below the Mason-Dixon line. In a work that lays bare many myths and stereotypes, Margaret Ripley Wolfe offers the first professional synthesis of southern women's experiences across the centuries. In telling their stories, she considers many lives -- those of Native-American, African American, and white women from the tidewater and Appalachia to the Gulf Coastal Plain and Mississippi Delta, women whose varied economic and social circumstances resist simple explanations. Here are stories of wives, mothers, pioneers, soldiers, suffragists, politicians, and activists -- women with ambition, grit and endurance.

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Daughters of Canaan: a saga of southern women

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The literature on Southern women and their role in U.S. history is widespread and fragmented. Taking a not entirely restrictive chronological approach, Wolfe has produced the first modern holistic and ... Read full review

Daughters of Canaan: a saga of southern women

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The literature on Southern women and their role in U.S. history is widespread and fragmented. Taking a not entirely restrictive chronological approach, Wolfe has produced the first modern holistic and ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Margaret Ripley Wolfe is professor of history at East Tennessee State University. A native of the South, she is the author of Kingsport, Tennessee, as well as numerous other books, articles, and essays.

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