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Books Books 1 - 10 of 20 on ... stones for his arches, elongated stones for his lintels, and flat stones for....
" ... stones for his arches, elongated stones for his lintels, and flat stones for his roof, we should admire his skill and regard him as the paramount power. Now the fragments of stone, though indispensable to the architect, bear to the edifice... "
Nature - Page 101
edited by - 1883
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The Shipley collection of scientific papers, Volume 37

Zoology - 1894
...spontaneously. We may even call them accidental, but this must be only in the sense in which we may say that the fragment of rock dropped from a height owes its shape to accident." I have always had a feeling, and it has grown on me with increasing experience, that the weak features...
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Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

American Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1889
...spontaneously. We may even call them accidental, but this must be only in the sense in which we may say that the fragment of rock dropped from a height owes its shape to accident." I have always had a feeling, and it has grown on me with increasing experience, that the weak features...
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New Englander and Yale Review, Volume 33

Edward Royall Tyler, William Lathrop Kingsley, George Park Fisher, Timothy Dwight - United States - 1874
...built up out of them. " If an architect," he says, " were to rear an edifice without the use of uncut stone by selecting from the fragments at the base of a precipice wedgedformed stones for his arches, elongated stones for his lintels. and flat stones for his roof,...
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The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Domestic animals - 1876
...as if they arose spontaneously. We may even call them accidental, but this must be only in the sense in which we say that a fragment of rock dropped from a height owes its shape to accident. It may be worth while briefly to consider the result of the exposure to unnatural conditions of a large...
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The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Domestic animals - 1887
...breeds, or by nature to the production of species. I may recur to the metaphor given in a former chapter: if an architect were to rear a noble and commodious...selecting from the fragments at the base of a precipice wcdge-forrned htones for his arches, elongated stones for his lintels, and flat stones for his roof,...
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Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

American Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1889
...spontaneously. We may even call them accidental, but this must be only in the sense in which we may say that the fragment of rock dropped from a height owes its shape to accident." I have always had a feeling, and it has grown on me with increasing experience, that the weak features...
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The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Domestic animals - 1892
...or by nature to the production of species. I may recur to the metaphor given in a former chapter : if an architect were to rear a noble and commodious edifice, without the use of cut stone, by i-electing from the fragments at the base of a precipice wedge-formed stones for his arches, elongated...
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Charles Darwin's Works: The variation of animals and plants under ...

Charles Darwin - Science - 1896
...as if they arose spontaneously. We may even call them accidental, but this must be only in the sense in which we say that a fragment of rock dropped from a height owes its shape to accident. It may be worth while briefly to consider the result of the exposure to unnatural conditions of a large...
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The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Domestic animals - 1898 - 495 pages
...production of species. I may recur to the metaphor given in a former chapter : if an architect wero to rear a noble and commodious edifice, without the use of cut stone, by ^electing from the fragments at the base of a precipice wedge-formed stones for his arches, elongated...
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Beacon Lights of History: The new era : a supplementary volume

John Lord - History - 1902
...domestic beings or by nature to the production of species. Employing a favorite metaphor, he said : " If an architect were to rear a noble and commodious...selecting from the fragments at the base of a precipice wedge-form stones for his arches, elongated stones for his lintels, and flat stones for his roof, we...
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