Forensic Interviewing: For Law Enforcement

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Xlibris Corporation, May 3, 2013 - Law - 395 pages
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Forensic Interviewing for Law Enforcement is a practical overview of interrogation law before guiding the reader into various legitimate strategies that aid in obtaining confessions. Included also is information covering such topics as understanding words used by criminals that aid in identifying them for later interrogation. There is a chapter devoted to analyzing verbal responses to identify the innocent and identifying those who provide verbal responses indicative of someone needing more investigation. The use of a psychological questionnaire is laid out completely for an investigator dealing with multiple suspects in a crime. Finally, there is a comprehensive chapter on the polygraph to inform the investigator what he can gain from its use and, importantly, how to utilize a polygraph examination to reach a successful case resolution.
 

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Contents

Chapter 18
111
Chapter 19
114
Chapter 20
119
Chapter 21
121
Chapter 22
137
Chapter 23
142
Chapter 24
144
Chapter 25
149

Chapter 5
34
Chapter 6
38
Chapter 7
42
Chapter 8
56
Chapter 9
59
Chapter 10
61
Chapter 11
64
Chapter 12
72
Chapter 13
75
Chapter 14
81
Chapter 15
88
Chapter 16
96
Chapter 17
102
Chapter 26
155
Chapter 27
158
Chapter 28
172
Chapter 29
176
Chapter 30
226
Chapter 31
229
Chapter 32
314
Chapter 33
337
Chapter 34
377
Chapter 35
382
References
390
Selected Bibliography
394
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Kelly D. Harrison was a Department of Defense certified polygraph examiner for over twenty-eight years. He was deployed to the US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for 2004 to 2005 as a member of the Joint Terrorism Task Force to interrogate suspected Al-Qaeda members captured in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Kelly used the law enforcement model of interviewing to obtain confessions of terrorist group membership, locations of weapon caches, links to other suspected terrorists, and aiding terrorist groups through poppy cultivation and heroin production. Kelly taught interview and interrogation skills at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), Glynco, Georgia, for four years. Kelly was a guest lecturer at the FLETC for several additional years and currently conducts pro bono polygraph examinations for the Colorado public defender.

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