The History of the Reign of the Emperor Charles V.: With a View of the Progress of Society in Europe, from the Subversion of the Roman Empire to the Beginning of the Sixteenth Century ...

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Hopkins & Seymour, and sold by G. F. Hopkins, 1804 - Europe
 

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Page 71 - May our Lord Jesus Christ have mercy upon thee, and absolve thee by the merits of his most holy passion. And I, by his authority, that of his blessed apostles, Peter and Paul, and of the most holy pope, granted and committed to me in these parts, do absolve thee, first from all ecclesiastical censures, in whatever manner they have been incurred ; then from all thy sins, transgressions, and excesses, how enormous soever they may be...
Page 377 - Unhappily for mankind, the vast influence which the order of Jesuits acquired by all these different means has been often exerted with the most pernicious effect. Such was the tendency of that discipline observed by the society in forming its members, and such the fundamental maxims in its constitution, that every Jesuit was taught to regard the interest of the order as the capital object, to which every consideration was to be sacrificed. This spirit of attachment to their order, the most ardent,...
Page 376 - Jesuits had obtained the chief direction of the education of youth in every Catholic country in Europe. They had become the confessors of almost all its monarchs ; a function of no small importance in any reign, but under a weak prince superior even to that of minister.
Page 107 - I am lawfully called," said he, " to appear in that city, and thither will I go in the name of the Lord, though as many devils as there are tiles on the houses were there combined against me.
Page 374 - Such a singular form of policy could not fail to impress its character on all the members of the order, and to give a peculiar force to all its operations. There...
Page 107 - Luther did not hesitate one moment about yielding obedience, and set out for Worms, attended by the herald who had brought the emperor's letter and safe-conduct.
Page 380 - Here, indeed, it must be confessed. they were of service: they found the inhabitants in a state little different from that which takes place among men when they first begin to unite together; strangers to the arts; subsisting precariously by hunting or fishing; and hardly acquainted with the first principles of subordination and government. — The Jesuits set themselves to instruct and...
Page 175 - ... on horseback, he ordered one of his attendants to place him under a tree, with his face towards the enemy • then fixing his eyes on the guard of his sword, which he held up instead of a cross, he addressed his prayers to God, and in this posture, which became his character both as a soldier and as a Christian, he calmly waited the approach of death.
Page 70 - Metz and Archbishop of Magdeburg, who, as his chief agent for retailing them in Saxony, employed Tetzel, a Dominican friar, of licentious morals, but of an active spirit, and remarkable for his noisy and popular eloquence. He, assisted by the monks of his order, executed the commission with great zeal and success, but with little discretion or decency ; and though, by magnifying excessively the benefit of their indulgences K, and by disposing of them at a h History of the Council of Trent, by F.
Page 371 - He proposed, that besides the three vows of poverty, of chastity, and of monastic obedience, which are common to all the orders of regulars, the members of his society should take a fourth vow of obedience to the pope, binding themselves to go whithersoever he should command for the service of religion, and without requiring any thing froni the holy see for their support.

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