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FACSIMILE OF A COPY OF THE GOLD MEDAL ORDERED BY CONGRESS, OCTOBER 16, 1787, "IN COMMEMORATION OF THE VALOR AND BRILLIANT SERVICES" OF "THE CHEVALIER JOHN PAUL

JONES." Designed by F. Dupré, Paris. The reverse shows the shattered Bonhomme Richard battling with

the Serapis, and the Alliance, at the left, firing into her consort, the Bonhomme Richard.

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REPORT OF JOHN PAUL JONES

CRUISE OF U. S. SHIP BONHOMME RICHARD AND SQUAD

RON, AND CAPTURE OF H. B. M. SHIPS SERAPIS AND
COUNTESS OF SCARBOROUGH

(From contemporary copy in the Library of Congress. Spelling and capitalization closely

followed.]

ON BOARD THE SHIP OF WAR SERAPIS,
AT ANCHOR WITHOUT THE TEXEL, IN HOLLAND,

Oct. 3, 1779. HONORED & DEAR SIR, When I had the honor of writing to you on the 11 August, previous to my departure from the Road of Groa, I had before me the most flattering prospect of rendering essential Service to the Common Cause of France and America. I had a full confidence in the Voluntary inclination & Ability of every Captain under my Command, to assist & Support me in my duty With cheerful Emulation ; & I Was persuaded that Every one of them Would pursue Glory in preference to intrest.

Whether I Was, or Was not deceived, Will best appear by a relation of Circumstances.

The Little Squadron under my orders, Consisting of the B. H. R., of 40 guns; the Alliance, of 36 guns; the Pallas, of 32 guns; the Cerf, of 18 guns; and the Vengeance, of 12 guns; joyned by two privateers, the Monsieur and the Granville, Sailed from the Road of Groa at Daybreak on the 14. of August; the Same day We Spoke With a Large Convoy bound from the Southward to Brest.

On the 18 we retook a large Ship belonging to Holland, Laden Chiefly With brandy & Wine that had been destined from Barcelona for Dunkirk, and taken Eight days before by an English privateer. Captain of the privateer Monsieur, took out of this prize Such Articles as he pleased in the Night; and the Next day being astern of the Squadron and to Windward, he actually wrote orders in his proper name, and Sent away the prize under one of his own officers. This, however, I Superseded by Sending her for L'Orient under my orders, in the Character of Commander in Chief. The Evening of the day following, the Monsieur Separated from the Squadron.

On the 20 We Saw and chaсed a Large Ship, but could not overtake her, She being to Windward.

On the 21 We Saw and Chaced another Ship that Was also to Windward, & thereby Eluded our pursuit: The Same afternoon, We took a brigantine Called the Mayflower, Laden With butter and Salt provision, bound from Limerick in Ireland for London: this Vessel I immediately expedited for L'Orient.

On the 23d, We Saw Cap Clear and the S. W. part of Ireland. That afternoon, it being Calm, I sent Some armed boats to take a brigantine that appeared in the N. W. quarter. Soon after, in the Evening, it became necessary to have a boat ahead of the Ship to tow, as the helm Could not prevent her from Laying across the tide of flood, Which Would have driven us into a deep and dangerous bay, Situated between the Rocks on the South called the Skallocks, and on the North Called the Blaskats; The Ship's boats being absent, I Sent my own barge ahead to tow the Ship. The boats took the brigantine; She being Called the Fortune and bound with a Cargo of oil, blubber & staves, from Newfoundland for Bristol. this Vessel I ordered to proceed immediately for Nantes or St. Malo. Soon after Sun Set the villain who towed the Ship, cut the tow rope and decamped with my barge. Sundry Shot, Were fired to bring them too Without effect; in the mean time the master of the B. H. R., without orders, manned one of the Ship’s boats, and With four Soldiers pursued the barge in order to stop the deserters. The Evenin Was then Clear and Serene, but the Zeal of that officer, [Mr. Cutting Lunt,]" induced him to pursue too far, and a fog Which came on Soon afterwards prevented the boats from rejoyning the Ship, altho' I Caused Signal guns to be frequently fired. The fog and Calm Continued the next day till towards the Evening. In the afternoon Captain Landais came on board the B. H. R. and beheaved towards me with great disrespect, affirming in the most indelicate manner and Language, that I had lost my boats and people thro' my imprudence in Sending boats to take a prize! He persisted in his reproaches, though he was assured by MM. de Weibert and de Chamillard, that the barge Was towing the Ship at the [time of] Elopement, and that she had not been Sent in pursuit of the prize. He was affronted, because I Would not the day before Suffer him to chace without my orders, and to approach the dangerous Shore I have already mentioned, Where he was an entire Stranger, and When there Was [not] sufficient wind to govern a Ship. He told me that he was the only American in the Squadron, and Was determined to follow his own opinion in chacing Where and when he thought proper, and in every other matter that concerned the Service, and that if I continued in that Situation three days longer, the Squadron Would be taken, &c. By the advice of Captain de Cottineau, and With the free Consent and approbation of M. De Varage, I sent the Cerf in to reconnoitre the Coast, and Endeavour to take the boats and people, the

a All brackets in this paper are in the original manuscript.-COMPILER.

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