Illusions of Influence: The Political Economy of United States-Philippines Relations, 1942-1960

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Stanford University Press, 1994 - Business & Economics - 263 pages
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Previous books on the US-Philippines relationship have portrayed it as one of colonial domination and economic exploitation. The author shows here that the relationship was far more complex on both sides. Although the United States had negligible economic interests in the Philippines, it saw a strong US military presence there as a necessary part of its global defence. In return, the Philippines received military and economic aid, and the Filipino elite were able to manipulate the relationship in ways that preserved their own entrenched power.
 

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Contents

Factionalism and Its Advantages
42
Saving the Patrimonial State
72
Magsaysay and the Illusion of Influence
96
Nationalism and the Bases
123
Filipino First
154
Conclusion
181
Notes
197
Bibliography
232
Index
257
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About the author (1994)

Nick Cullather is Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University.

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