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2c. In re Greene. Petition to Circuit Court, Southern District

of Ohio, August 4, 1892, for writ of habeas corpus to secure release from the custody of the marshal, by whom he was held awaiting an order for the removal of Greene to Massachusetts to answer to the indictment in the Greenhut case.

Prisoner discharged. 3. United States v. Nelson. Indictment returned January 20,

1892, in the District Court, District of Minnesota, charging a number of lumber dealers with conspiring to raise

the price of lumber. Demurrer to indictment sustained. 4. United States v. Trans-Missouri Freight Association.

Petition filed January 6, 1892, in the Circuit Court, District of Kansas, to enjoin the operations of a combination of railroads engaged in interstate commerce, formed for the alleged purpose of maintaining “uniform rates," etc. Petition dismissed by Circuit Court; decree of dismissal affirmed by Circuit Court of Appeals, and reversed by the United States Supreme Court. Final decree

entered June 7, 1897. 5. United States v. Workingmen's Amalgamated Council of

New Orleans et al. Petition filed March 25, 1893, in the Circuit Court, Eastern District of Louisiana, to restrain defendants, a combination of workmen, draymen, etc., from interfering with the movement of merchandise in interstate and foreign commerce through the city of New Orleans. An injunction was granted on March 27, 1893, and the decree was later affirmed by the Circuit Court

of Appeals. 6. United States v. Patterson et al. Indictments returned February 28 and June 7, 1893, in the Circuit Court, District of Massachusetts, charging the defendants with entering into a combination for the alleged purpose of controlling the price of cash registers. Letter of Attorney General dated October 16, 1893, shows case was allowed to lapse because of reconciliation of complaining witness with defendants.

7. United States V.. E. C. Knight Company. Petition filed

January 30, 1894, in the Circuit Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania, to enjoin the operations of an alleged Sugar Trust. The petition was dismissed January 30, 1894. On appeal the decree of dismissal was affirmed by both the Circuit Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court.

President Cleveland's Second Administration, March 4, 1893, to March 4,

1897.

(RICHARD OLNEY, Attorney General, March 6, 1893, to June 7, 1895; JUDSON HARMON,

Attorney General, June 8, 1895, to March 5, 1897.) 1. United States v. Eugene V. Debs et al. Petition filed

July 3, 1894, in the Circuit Court, District of Indiana, seeking to restrain interference by American Railway Union and forty-nine individual defendants with mails and interstate commerce carried by all railroads operating in Indiana. An injunction was issued on July 3, 1894, which was continued in force until September 19, 1898, when the case was dismissed at the instance of the

Government. la. United States v. Agler. Information filed July 12, 1894,

in the Circuit Court, District of Indiana, charging contempt of court in disobeying an injunction restraining Agler and others from interfering with interstate commerce and obstructing the mails. Agler was a member of the American Railway Union, the members of which had been enjoined from interfering with the carrying of the mails and from obstructing interstate commerce.

Information quashed. 2. United States v. Elliott. Petitions filed July 6 and October

24, 1894, in the Circuit Court, Eastern District of Missouri, to restrain Elliott, Debs, and others, members of the American Railway Union, from carrying out an unlawful conspiracy to interfere with interstate commerce and to obstruct the carrying of the mails. Preliminary injunction granted. Final decree entered April 6, 1896, against 295 defendants, and temporary

injunction made permanent. 3. United States v. Debs et al. Petition filed July 2, 1894,

in the Circuit Court, Northern District of Illinois, alleging conspiracy to obstruct the mails and to interfere with interstate commerce. A temporary injunction was

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issued on July 2, 1894, for violation of which contempt proceedings were instituted. Original petition dismissed on July 28, 1899, at the instance of the Govern

ment. , 3a. United States v. Debs et al. Proceedings in contempt in

stituted in the Circuit Court, Northern District of Illinois, December 14, 1894, to punish Debs and others for disobeying an injunction restraining them from interfering with interstate

and with obstructing the mails. Defendants found guilty and

punished. 3b. In re Debs, petitioner. Application to United States Su

preme Court July 2, 1894, for a writ of habeas corpus to secure a discharge from imprisonment for disobeying an injunction of the Circuit Court for the Northern District of Illinois, restraining Debs and others from conspiring to interfere with interstate commerce. Peti

tion for the writ denied. 4. United States v. Cassidy. Indictment returned in July,

1894, in the District Court, Northern District of California, charging defendants with conspiring to obstruct the mails of the United States (sec. 5440, R. S.) and combining and conspiring to restrain the interstate and foreign trade and commerce of the United States. The prosecution grew out of the great Pullman strike in California in June and July, 1894, which was mainly supported and carried on through the organization known as the American Railway Union. The trial resulted in a disagreement of the jury on April 6, 1895, and a

nolle prosequi was entered on July 1, 1895. 5. United States v. Moore. Indictment returned November

4, 1895, against the members of an association of coal dealers in Salt Lake City for entering into a conspiracy, while Utah was a Territory, to regulate the price of coal. Moore was tried and convicted in the District Court of Utah. The Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the judgment of conviction on the ground that upon the admission of Utah as a State it was no longer a “Territory' within the meaning of the Antitrust Act, and the combination not being in restraint of interstate commerce the court had no jurisdiction of the offense.

6.

United States v. Joint Traffic Association. Petition filed

January 8, 1896, in the Circuit Court, Southern District of New York, against a combination of 31 railroad companies organized for the alleged purpose of suppressing competition in fixing rates, etc. The Circuit Court dismissed the petition, and its action was affirmed by the Court of Appeals. These judgments were reversed by the Supreme Court, and on March 3, 1899, a decree was entered enjoining the defendants from observing the agreement or “ articles of organization" entered into.

7.

United States v. Addyston Pipe and Steel Company. Peti

tion filed December 10, 1896, in the Circuit Court, Eastern District of Tennessee, to enjoin the operations of a combination of manufacturers of cast-iron pipe, by which it was attempted to control prices. The petition was dismissed by the Circuit Court. The Court of Appeals reversed the decree of the Circuit Court and remanded the case with instructions to enter a decree for the Government. On appeal to the Supreme Court the action of the Circuit Court of Appeals was affirmed, and a decree dissolving the combination was entered on June 6, 1898.

8.

United States v. Hopkins et al. Petition filed December 31,

1896, in the Circuit Court, District of Kansas, to restrain the operations of the “Kansas City Live Stock Exchange,” organized to control shipments of live stock. An injunction was granted and an appeal was taken to the Circuit Court of Appeals, from whence it was removed to the Supreme Court of the United States. That court reversed the decree of the Circuit Court and remanded the case with instructions to dismiss the petition. A decree of dismissal was entered on May 29, 1899.

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