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in oatmeal products and by-products. Argued before the circuit judges in March, 1916, and decided adversely to the Government. An appeal to the Supreme Court was dismissed upon motion of the Government June

1, 1920. 5. United States v. Hippen et al. Indictment returned June 25, 1913, in the District Court, Western District of Oklahoma, against The Oklahoma Brokerage Co., and two other corporations and the officers thereof, alleging a conspiracy to restrain and monopolize interstate trade and commerce in fruits and vegetables. Demurrer sus

tained October 1, 1913. 6. United States v. Thompson et al. Indictment returned July 1, 1913, in the District Court, Southern District of New York, alleging that the defendants conspired to run a corner in cotton on the New York Cotton Exchange. Defendants entered pleas of nolo contendere in December, 1913, and fines aggregating $18,000 were

assessed. 7. United States v. American Telephone & Telegraph Com

pany et al. Petition filed July 24, 1913, in the District Court at Portland, Oreg., seeking to destroy a monopoly of the telephone business on the Pacific coast. After the introduction of part of the testimony in chief on behalf of the Government, the defendants agreed to meet the demands of the Government, and a decree sustain

ing the petition was entered on March 26, 1914. 8. United States v. Reading Company et al (anthracite coal

combination). Petition filed September 2, 1913, in the District Court at Philadelphia, Pa., against a combination consisting of Reading Co., and affiliated corporations, charging it with restraining and monopolizing trade in anthracite coal.

The decision of the District Court was favorable to the Government in substantial part—i. e., it was held that the union through a holding company of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Co. and the Lehigh & WilkesBarre Coal Co., two of the great anthracite coal-producing companies, is a combination in restraint of trade. In some important respects, however, the decision was adverse to the Government. Cross appeals were taken to the Supreme Court. The case was argued during the October term, 1916, and restored to the docket for reargument. It was reargued during the October term, 1917, and again reargued in October, 1919. In an opinion rendered April 26, 1920, the Supreme Court reversed the decision of the District Court and granted virtually the full relief prayed for by the Government. A motion by defendants to modify the decree directed to be entered by the Supreme Court was denied June 7, 1920. Final decree entered June 6, 1921. An appeal was taken to the Supreme Court by a committee representing the common stockholders of Reading Co. This appeal was argued on January 18, 1922, and reargued in April, 1922. The decree was modified and affirmed and the case was remanded to the District Court for appropriate action in accordance with the opinion. June 28, 1923, final decree entered in pur

suance of Supreme Court mandate. 9. United States v. The National Wholesale Jewelers' Associa

tion et al. Petition filed November 18, 1913, in the District Court, Southern District of New York, charging defendants with conspiring to eliminate all competition-except as between wholesalers or jobbers-for the trade of all classes of retail dealers in jewelry and jewelry products. The case was not contested, and on January 30, 1914, a decree was entered enjoining the

defendants from further carrying out the conspiracy. 10. United States v. American Can Company et al. Petition

filed November 29, 1913, in the District Court, District of Maryland, charging defendants with having monopolized the manufacture and sale of tin cans. In July, 1916, the District Court entered a decree adjudging the defendant a combination in restraint of trade. The only relief granted, however, was the retention of the bill-i. e., keeping the combination under the supervision of the

court. Considering that inadequate, the Government appealed to the Supreme Court. Because of similarity of this case with that of the case against United States Steel Corporation (supra, p. 90), the Government dis

missed its appeal on June 6, 1921. 11. United States v. John P. White et al. Indictment returned

December 1, 1913, in the District Court, District of Colorado, charging officials and members of the United Mine Workers of America with monopolizing all diggers of coal and mine laborers and with restraining interstate commerce in coal. Nolle prosequi entered January 8,

1916. 12. United States v. Frank J. Hayes et al. Indictment returned

December 1, 1913, in the District Court, District of
Colorado, charging a combination and conspiracy by
mine workers to interfere with the mining of coal in
Colorado and its transportation to and sale in other

States. Nolle prosequi entered January 8, 1916. 13. United States v. Southern Pacific Company, Central Pacific

Railway Company et al. Petition filed February 11, 1914, in the District Court at Salt Lake City, Utah, to compel the Southern Pacific to relinquish its control of the Central Pacific. A decision adverse to the Government having been rendered, an appeal was taken to the Supreme Court, where the case was argued April 20, 1921, reargued at the October term, 1921, and opinion rendered May 29, 1922. It was therein decided that the stock ownership in the Central Pacific acquired by the Southern Pacific was violative of the Sherman Act and the court directed that a decree be entered severing the control by the Southern Pacific of the Central Pacific, but stated that in accomplishing this purpose, so far as compatible with the decision, the mortgage lien, asserted in the brief filed for the Central Union Trust Co., should be protected. Subsequent to this decision the Interstate Commerce Commission, acting pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by the Transportation Act of 1920, found the stock ownership to be in the public interest and accordingly issued an order authorizing the acquisition and control, which order was upheld by the District Court upon the ground that the Transportation Act supersedes the Sherman Antitrust Act where the Interstate Commerce Commission finds such control to be in the public interest. Final decree on mandate

entered June 18, 1923. 14. United States v. Lehigh Valley Railroad Company et al.

Petition filed March 18, 1914, in the District Court, Southern District of New York, charging the defendants with having monopolized the production, transportation, and sale of anthracite coal from mines tributary to Lehigh Valley Railroad Co., in violation of the Antitrust Act, and charging the said railroad company with transporting in interstate commerce coal in which it has an interest in violation of the Commodity Clause of the Act to Regulate Commerce. Argued in November, 1914. Petition dismissed December 21, 1914, principally on the authority of the case of United States v. Delaware, Lackawanna do Western Railroad Company et al., decided by the circuit judges for the Third Circuit, which was later reversed by the Supreme Court. An appeal from the order of dismissal was noted and the case was argued in the Supreme Court during the October term, 1916. It was reargued in November, 1917, and again restored to the docket for reargument. In October, 1919, the case was submitted to the court without argument. Case decided in favor of Government December 6, 1920, and remanded with instructions to enter decree dissolving combination. Interlocutory decree entered February 24, 1921, granting relief pending filing of final plan of dissolution. On October 7, 1921, a plan of dissolution and the Government's objections thereto were filed, hearing on which was postponed pending a decision in the case of United States v. Reading Co. et al. Final decree entered November 7, 1923.

15. United States v. Knauer et al. Indictment returned June

4, 1914, at Des Moines, Southern District of Iowa, charging defendants with having entered into a combination in restraint of trade in plumbing supplies. Motion to quash and demurrer overruled November 25, 1914. Trial commenced February 10, 1915, and verdict of guilty returned February 24, 1915. Four defendants fined amounts aggregating $3,000 and writ of error granted as to them. Case stood on motion for new trial as to 31 defendants pending decision on writ of error by the Circuit Court of Appeals. The decision of the Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the judgment of the District Court, and fines and costs aggregating approximately. $4,000 were imposed. Fines aggregating

$4,500 were imposed on the remaining defendants. 16. United States v. The American Wringer Company et al.

Indictment returned May 22, 1914, in the District Court, Western District of Pennsylvania, charging defendants with unlawfully engaging in a combination in restraint of interstate trade and commerce in clothes wringers. Pleas of nolo contendere were entered on November 13,

1914, and fines aggregating $6,000 imposed. 17. United States v. Booth Fisheries Company et al. Indict

ment returned July 20, 1914, in the District Court, Western District of Washington, charging defendants with entering into a combination and conspiracy in restraint of interstate trade and commerce in fresh fish. As to all the individual defendants and one corporate defendant the indictment was dismissed. The other defendants plead nolo contendere and fines aggregating

$13,000 were imposed. 18. United States v. New York, New Haven & Hartford

Railroad Company et al. Petition filed July 23, 1914, in the District Court, Southern District of New York, alleging monopolization of transportation facilities in New England and praying for a dissolution thereof. Decree entered October 17, 1914. Because of adverse

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