Stumbling on Happiness

Front Cover
Harper Perennial, 2007 - Happiness - 277 pages
50 Reviews
Why are lovers quicker to forgive their partners for infidelity than for leaving dirty dishes in the sink? Why do patients remember long medical procedures as less painful than short ones? Why do home sellers demand prices they wouldn't dream of paying if they were home buyers? Why does the line at the grocery store always slow down when we join it? In this book, Harvard psychologist Gilbert describes the foibles of imagination and illusions of foresight that cause each of us to misconceive our tomorrows and misestimate our satisfactions. Using the latest research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy, and behavioral economics, Gilbert reveals what we have discovered about the uniquely human ability to imagine the future, our capacity to predict how much we will like it when we get there, and why we seem to know so little about the hearts and minds of the people we are about to become.--From publisher description.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Oy. How to talk about this frustrating book. Very funny, but I'm sure some readers would get turned off by his style of wit as it does kinda get old. Lots of insights into how the mind works, but the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - les121 - LibraryThing

I heard about this book on the Freakonomics podcast and was instantly intrigued. This is not a self-help book on how to be happy - it’s a rigorous scientific examination of why we’re so bad at ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Daniel Gilbert was born in 1957 and is the Harvard College Professor of Psychology at Harvard University in Cambridge Massachusetts. He has won numerous awards for his teaching and research, including the Phi Beat Kappa Teaching Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology. His research has been featured in the 'New York Times Magazine', Forbes, Money, 'The New Yorker', 'Scientific American', 'Oprah Magazine', 'Psychology Today', and more. His short stories have appeared in 'Amazing Stories' and 'Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine', as well as other magazines and anthologies. 'Stumbling on Happiness' was awarded the Royal Society of Science Prize in 2007.

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