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gion, and disliked its doctrines ; but he knew that no religion was ever yet put down by exclusion. The way to put down that and every species of error was to instruct and to facilitate instruction. He admired, therefore, an institution, which he was glad to see introduced into this county, the Auxiliary So. ciety for the Distribution of Bibles. Let thein be assured that the spirit of light and the spirit of darkness nerer walked together that exclusion which deprives men of every incentive to exertion and instruction--which requires men to be ambitious of attaining it for their own advancement, are instruments which cannot be employed by the same hand. The greatest step towards enlightening the Catholics, was bringing them forward into civil life; and let it be well observed that in proportion as the Catholics in other countries had been enlightened, in the same proportion the Pope of Rome had lost allegiance ; and it was in countries where civil incapacities prevailed, that the Pope of Rome now possessed most power. .“ The gentleman who proposed theresolution wished to coinmit them; the noble Lord who moved the address, wished them merely to leave the consideration of the subject to Par. liament, under the persuasion that, by so doing alone, a conclusion might be come to, safe to all the existing establishments in this country ; and which, at the same time, would neither impair the military strength of the state, nor disturb the civil harmony which ought to exist among all classes, on which our safety de.

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That was the danger which he dreaded. The noble Lord who moved the address, said the Catholics had been always temperate and prudent; but that the meetings which had been held at Dublin in the course of last summer were of a very different description, would be admitted, he believed, even by gentlemen of the party of the noble Lord himself.”

Lord Holland said, " That not having resided in the county, and consequently not being acquainted with many of the gentlemen present, he had hesitated before he ventured to address the meeting; but as a native of Wiltshire, and a landholder in it, he hoped he might be excused for saying a few words on the question upon which they had that day been convened ; they should be few : for after the luminous, full, and convincing speech of the noble Marquis, it could not be necessary to say much-he wished, however, to make some observations on what had fallen from the honourable gentleman who spoke last, and he thought he could prove that if that genticman's vote was to be consistent with his view of the question, it must be against the resolution he had risen to support the fact was, the fears that gentleman expressed, which he should examine presently, were confined to one point ; whereas the laws against the Catholics were directed to others, and that gentleman could not therefore consistently vote against any alteration of laws which guarded against fears of which he had no apprehension---that honourable gentleman was however a fair arguer; the fairest he had heard in or out of parliament; for he avowedly and distinctly said, that it was not the power, the army, or the ambition of Bonaparte which he feared, but it was the helpless old man of whom we had this day heard so much--the Pope !"

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Mr. Estcourt explained. He appealed to the Meeting if he had not been misrepresented by the noble Lord. What he had said was, si that be was not afraid of the individual who was Pope, but because he was under the controul of Bonaparte.” ! Lord Holland resumed, “ He was sorry if he had mistated Mr. Estcourt; he had not meant to do so, and had understood him as he now explained himself, to fear the Pope's influence over Catholics on account of Bonaparte's influ'ence over the Pope: in other words, he feared Bonaparte might make a tool of this formida. ble old man. Had he then just fallen under his yoke ? No, he has been in his power for years, and what use has been made of him? Oh, but he supposed, that since the Pope's captivity or dependence on France, there have been 'no Catholics opposed to Bona parte ? Where then had the greatest struggle with France for now near five years been maintained ? He had thought it had been in Spain, in Catholic Spain, in the country the most devoted, the most bigotted to that religion on earth-and "yet he had never heard that instead of troops,

Bonaparte had sent papal bulls to bid the Spaniards lay down their arms and acknowledge Joseph. Nor did he believe, nor did any 'one believe, that Catholics as they were, the Spaniards would pay the slightest attention to

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any such mandate. We have heard to-day," that in Russia, in this very campaign, in which he has met with such signal and unexampled misfortunes, he has been opposed, baffled too by Roman Catholic generals-Why, if what the gentleman feared had any reality-why should Bona parte collect such vast armaments ? why should he brave the elements, why ex pose himself, and his three hundred thousand men to ice, to frost, to famine, to the resentment of the Russians, and to the fury of the Cossacks? Why all this trouble, expence, and danger when he had a snug little old man in a corner who could write a card to Count Wittgenstein to disband the armies of his enemy, and lay the Russian Empire at once at his mercy? The fear was preposterous-but this question had sometimes been argued (not, however, in Parliament-no; such arguments were reserved for places where there was no opportunity of immediate reply, for anonymous hand-bills, pamphlets, he feared too occasionally sermons and even charges ; ) it had been argued as if it was a question whether we should have a Pro. testant or a Catholic establishment. But even, if he were to admit, for the sake of argument, and it would be a very great and preposterous ad. mission indeed, that all which was said against Catholics were true, yet it would be difficult to shèw that when all that was now asked was. granted, they would be one step nearer an establishment than they are now. He would not dwell on such an ignorant argument, because he had not that day heard it; and the gentle.' man who spoke last had shewn candour, fair

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